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RICHARD HUTCHINS

Moving from Windows to Apple

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Hi all,

As a rank novice I'd like some advice. I use a Samsung Laptop running Windows 10. I've finally had it up to here with Windows, years of endless endless problems and one pattern; a system that on every laptop just runs more slowly each month and then inevitably becomes almost unusable. I am going to move to an Apple, my kids have their Apple Macs for 10 years, not once has there been an issue. Not once!!  So my question is obviously; what do you all think about changing and if so would a reconditioned Apple Macbook Air 7.2 do the trick with Cakewalk? 8gb ram 256gbssd 15-5350u processor,( means zilch to me) I could buy new but ouch they are pricey.

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I'm going to be very transparent in my reply. It may cross some people here, but we're all entitled to our opinions, right? I love Apple products. I hate Apple as a company. IMO they are snobs and try to "convert" all their customers into being snobs as well. What do I mean by snobs? "Apple is great. Everyone else (PC) sucks." No, everyone else doesn't suck.

Gratefully there are more choices than one so people can choose what kind of computer they want. PC's always have poor performance and Apple's never fail? That is blatantly false. If you believe that you are living in Disneyland. I have many examples from running both PC's and Mac's in a pro studio to know better. They both have their pluses and minuses. -Rant over-

Now then, Cakewalk is PC only.  You will need to have some way to boot into Windows from your Mac if you want to run Cakewalk. Many people do that--and even some from this forum. They can let you know which tool works best, but it's done all the time.

Good luck! 🙂

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With programs like Cakewalk, the idea is to optimize performance. Running it in a virtual system, for example, is going in the opposite direction. Not worth it. If you go to Apple you'll have to use Logic or some other program that works on that system.

I agree that Apple seems to create that obnoxious fanboy thing. It's so untrue as to be laughable.

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I had the exact opposite issue, my mac ran fine until Apple kept telling me I needed to update the OS to keep it supported.  I eventually made the mistake of upgrading it then it became so slow it was un-useable.  This also happened to my iPad, needed to upgrade the OS in order to support the apps.  Not very happy with Apple products, mine are so slow they are completely un-usable.  I've had the same Windows/Intel desktop for years without issues.

The mac is now happily running Linux.

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Posted (edited)

Running Apple BootCamp will allow you to dual-boot Windows on your Intel based Mac computer. But you would still be using Windows for Cakewalk, which you say you want to avoid.

https://help.cakewalk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360002369733-Is-Cakewalk-by-BandLab-still-PC-only-Will-it-run-on-Mac-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boot_Camp_(software)

Logic Pro X for $199 would probably be the best DAW replacement for Cakewalk if you wanted to go Mac only. https://www.apple.com/logic-pro/

 

 

Edited by abacab
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6 hours ago, RICHARD HUTCHINS said:

.... my kids have their Apple Macs for 10 years, not once has there been an issue. Not once!! 

I call BS.

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I have no axe to grind; I despise all Big Business Conglomerates, there are no good guys at all. They just want your money... period. But as I cant use Cakewalk on a Mac I will have a rethink.

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36 minutes ago, Scott MacBride said:

I had the exact opposite issue, my mac ran fine until Apple kept telling me I needed to update the OS to keep it supported.  I eventually made the mistake of upgrading it then it became so slow it was un-useable.  This also happened to my iPad, needed to upgrade the OS in order to support the apps.  Not very happy with Apple products, mine are so slow they are completely un-usable.  I've had the same Windows/Intel desktop for years without issues.

The mac is now happily running Linux.

I had this exact same experience, although a complete re-install on to an SSD and upgrading to 8GB RAM did solve it. In saying that, replacing the HD on a Mac mini is a prize PITA.

All I use my mac for now for software development, and even then, it's just as a compiler. My actual development is done on a PC.

As for running Logic... is a great DAW, but a few things to consider:

  • Unless you're running a fairly modern mac pro, you're going to be disappointed with performance, and how many instruments & effects it will cope with.
  • Older macs CANNOT be upgraded. I've got a mid 2010 mac mini. It won't let me install the latest MacOS.
  • Apple regularly limit what versions of MacOS their software will run on, so you may be stuck with an older version until you upgrade your mac
  • Apple deprecate hardware interfaces (e.g. firewire, USB etc) so you may be limited to what audio interfaces you can use, and adapters may or may not work.
  • Upgrading your mac nowadays is a quite often big-bang approach (especially with the lower range models). Apple are making it increasingly difficult for you to upgrade individual components. At least with a PC you can upgrade your components bit by bit.

So before you commit to the Mac route... prepare to spend some serious cash... and be prepared to spend more once Apple deem your hardware "old".

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11 minutes ago, msmcleod said:

Older macs CANNOT be upgraded. I've got a mid 2010 mac mini. It won't let me install the latest MacOS.

I think I have that same Mac Mini model. I originally purchased it for my Dad to use for online banking. Then it hit end of life when the MacOS couldn't be updated due to the hardware, and the hardware couldn't be upgraded, etc. Then his bank started to block his out of date Safari browser. Then I couldn't find a current version of Chrome or Firefox that would install on that version of MacOS.

So I swapped it out with a new ChromeBox. That's really all that was needed for getting online with an up to date browser. :D

Now that Mac Mini makes a great paperweight. I suppose I could find some use for it, but I haven't decided yet, LOL!

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Posted (edited)

Hello Richard and folks, 

I use to run my SONAR from a laptop for years, and just like you I was  P. O'd, finally my rep at Sweetwater "Dave Brow", suggested that I buy a Sweetwater Creation Station, so I did, I purchased the Sweetwater Creation Station v5 with an Intel 7700 cpu, 32Gb of RAM with upto 64Gb MAX, support for 3 monitors which I actually run, and I have been happy ever since, seriously get yourself a Creation Station or at least check it out first.

Jimi Jones

 

Edited by jimijones55
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3 hours ago, RICHARD HUTCHINS said:

I have no axe to grind; I despise all Big Business Conglomerates, there are no good guys at all. They just want your money... period. But as I cant use Cakewalk on a Mac I will have a rethink.

What, you expect to just get it for free?😉

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4 hours ago, RICHARD HUTCHINS said:

I have no axe to grind; I despise all Big Business Conglomerates, there are no good guys at all. They just want your money... period. But as I cant use Cakewalk on a Mac I will have a rethink.

A better option would be going for a custom built DESKTOP  audio PC.

Windows laptops can be used of course, but there are sometimes compromises and issues with using them for a DAW, especially with the typical off the shelf consumer laptops. They can be slow, and configured mainly for extended battery life and lower heat output, rather than raw processing power. Getting a laptop suitable for serious audio work will cost more than a very good desktop.

Something to consider is whether  you really need the portability factor.

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I build a new PC every 2 years or so to keep things stable and new. I know this might not be practical for everyone because of costs, but my last build was back in May of 2016. Only reason I haven't built another is because this particular build has been rock solid.  Apple make great products no doubt and I've wanted to get a MAC to try out logic myself. Im just having great results using a PC, so why fix what is not broke. that's my 2 cents anyway.

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@RICHARD HUTCHINS,

As others have correctly pointed out, Cakewalk by BandLab only runs on a 64 bit Windows 7, 8, 8.1 or 10 operating system.  That means you're stuck with a Windows computer or you're switching DAWs.

If I assume you're sticking with Windows to continue using Cakewalk by BandLab and don't care to become proficient with computer hardware then I second JimJones55's idea to purchase a purpose built music computer.

In addition to looking at the Sweetwater computers, may I suggest you contact forum member, @Jim Roseberry.  He works for a company that builds music computers.  He also provides free advice.

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Posted (edited)

Well, in my opinion as long as you don't use Thunderbolt a Mac makes no sense. Yes, Apple made great computers 10 years ago but today? No.  

And next year if thunderbolt becomes USB 4  - There will be even fewer reasons to buy a Mac for Music Production/recording.

My advice in 2019. Install windows server 2019 for your music production/recording only. A streamlined windows 10 and you are ready to wait for USB4.

 

And the mention MacBook Air is, in my opinion, the worst Music Produktion/recording Computer you could use.

Why? That's why...

 

 

Edited by Towi

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Thunderbolt works just fine on a PC (if you know how to properly configure it).

 

A MacBook Air is a particularly bad choice for DAW purposes.

The reason is simple, its CPU has *slow* clock-speed.

 

When choosing a CPU for DAW purposes, the most critical factor is clock-speed.

Not all processes in a DAW can be multi-threaded (spread across cores).

Things like playing/monitoring in realtime thru an AmpSim plugin at 96k using a 32-sample ASIO buffer size (super low round-trip latency)... don't lend themselves to being spread across multiple cores.

Some plugins don't make use of multiple cores.  ie: UVI's Falcon

 

More cores is certainly beneficial... but not at the expense of significant clock-speed.

This is why Xeon CPUs (although more expensive) are often a significant performance hit... compared to standard CPUs.  They have more cores... but (typically) significantly slower clock-speed.

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Windows shouldn't be that bad. I admit I've never used a mac but I've never felt inclined to. For me, windows runs fine on both my laptop and my desktop PC. I am using windows 7 still though.

You probably just need to do a general cleanup and defrag or maybe you have a slow hard drive to start with or not enough ram. With an SSD you shouldn't worry about it. There really shouldn't be many problems at all.

It can get a little slower as time goes by depending on how much you use it but a system clean and defrag usually fixes that. Really, it should be 6 - 12 months before it needs this. It shouldn't get that slow.

I've thought about switching to Mac but the limited options/greater difficulty in adding hard drives and upgrading turns me off.

You don't give the specs of your current system, perhaps there is a way to upgrade it without too much cost. Also, you don't say what the problems are. It might be possible to get what you already have running well.

 

 

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There's also the Windows 10 Fresh Start, which keeps only your personal files and starts your system with a fresh copy of Windows.

Something to try before getting a whole new computer.

It gets rid of all of your apps and settings, though, so it's a last resort.

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