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Jim Roseberry

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Jim Roseberry last won the day on June 29

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  1. We've got one client (scores Films) who's running a Cubase template with 2600 (that's not a typo) tracks. He's not running at a 64-sample ASIO buffer size.
  2. Here's hoping 2021 is a much better year!!!
  3. In nearly 30 years, I don't think I've ever been contacted by a client who wanted to work at high ASIO buffer sizes (higher latency)... or at lower CPU clock-speed (to conserve battery-life or power). 😁 Folks have different levels of needs/expectations.
  4. Live Nation recently publicized that they're going to ask performers to take a substantial pay cut. This (naturally) upsets performers... If the venue can only be 1/4 capacity, that means 1/4 the intake. Everyone loses... and ticket prices skyrocket even higher
  5. Fixed x2 😁 In Ohio: Gigs (only large clubs can afford full bands) start at 6-7pm... and end at 10:30-11pm Last-call is at 9:45pm. Alcohol sales end at 10pm. Bars have to be closed at 11pm. I don't mind the early gigs... but does the "Rona" only come out at 11:01pm? People are "loading up" at last call... leaving hammered... and/or going to private after-parties to continue.
  6. You'll need a MIDI Drum Map that changes the MIDI notes (recorded from the TD25)... into the MIDI notes that trigger the desired sounds from EZ Drummer. If one doesn't already exist, I'm sure you could create one in 30-60 minutes. Create a test project with the following: MIDI Drum performance (recorded from the TD25) - on a MIDI Track MIDI Drum Map (to map the TD25 pad notes to articulations in EZ Drummer) Instrument Track with EZ Drummer You could (also) change the MIDI notes the TD25 pads send... to match the desired sounds in EZ Drummer (thus eliminating the need to use a MIDI Drum Map). There are also MIDI Drum Maps in EZ Drummer (there is a "Roland" Map but not sure it matches the TD25). There's no right/wrong way to get to the proper MIDI notes (to trigger the desired EZ Drummer sounds). Pick what makes most sense to you. With the above test project: On the MIDI track with your MIDI drum performance, select the MIDI Drum Map (you created for the TD25) as the MIDI output If you use a MIDI Drum Map in Cakewalk, that Drum Map allows you to select the EZ Drummer instance for the MIDI output of each mapped MIDI note If you use EZ Drummer's MIDI Maps, skip this step. If you changed the MIDI notes sent by the Nitro pads (on the TD25 itself), skip this step. If not using MIDI Drum Maps in Cakewalk, set the MIDI Output (of the recorded MIDI Drum track) to EZ Drummer. The recorded MIDI drum performance should now be triggering EZ Drummer (with the desired articulations). When you insert EZ Drummer into your Cakewalk project, you have two options for the Instrument track. Simple Instrument Track - creates a single stereo output for EZ Drummer Instrument Track Per Output - creates a track for each audio output from EZ Drummer With the first option, you'd have to mix the drums within EZ Drummer. With the second option, you've got individual mic channels that can be mixed within Cakewalk (Kick, Snare, HiHat, Toms, Overheads, etc). There's no right/wrong... just how you prefer to work The Focusrite Scarlett series is OK when it comes to round-trip latency (~6ms at the smallest buffer size). It would be better for triggering EZ Drummer samples in realtime (than the TD25's onboard audio interface)... as it offers lower round-trip latency. Some drummers would find even 5-6ms round-trip latency too much lag to comfortably trigger EZ Drummer samples in realtime. Get that lag (round-trip latency) sub 3ms... and it feels a lot more immediate.
  7. The lower the latency (smaller the buffer size), the greater the advantage of the 10900k's significantly higher clock-speed. The higher the buffer size (higher the latency), the greater the advantage of the 3970x's many additional cores. I don't consider 512-sample buffer size to be small. I wouldn't work at anything higher than 256-samples. Most times, I'm working at 32/64/128-sample ASIO buffer size. Insert a single instance of Helix Native... running with Presonus Quantum set to 96k using a 32-sample ASIO buffer size. That's running at 1ms total round-trip latency. An extreme example... AMD 3950x and 3970x - audio will glitch Intel 10900k - no audio glitches If I'm paying $2000 for a CPU, I want it to excel at ultra low latency performance. 10900k is about 1/3 the cost of the 3970x... and offers a great balance of features: 5.3GHz all-core clock-speed Runs quiet with large/quality air-cooking 10 cores/20 processing threads TDP = 125w There's no such thing as a quiet 3970x machine (TDP = 280w)... unless you allow it to thermal-throttle (which negates the purpose)
  8. Your audio interface will determine the lowest latency you can achieve. Of course, the machine has to be able to keep up with the load (or you'll hear glitches or experience drop-outs). Are you using the TD25 as your audio interface... or are you using the Laptop's onboard audio? The TD25 (if it's like the large TD50) functions as a USB audio interface. Between the Laptop's onboard audio and TD25, the TD25 has a proper ASIO driver (which will out-perform ASIO-4-ALL). If you're after super low round-trip latency, you won't be happy using either the TD25 or Laptop's onboard audio as your audio interface. If getting a dedicated audio interface (that offers low round-trip latency) isn't an option, use the TD25. If you're dealing with an audio interface that doesn't offer 5ms round-trip latency or lower, forget triggering samples from EZ Drummer in realtime (there will be too much lag). In this scenario, I'd record the MIDI performance from the TD25 (monitoring its internal sounds while tracking against the click-track). Once the TD25 MIDI performance is recorded, you can then route the MIDI track to an instance of EZ Drummer. You'll miss being able to play the EZ Drummer sounds in realtime... but it's the most effective work-around (to avoid latency). If you had a Thunderbolt audio interface like the Presonus Quantum... paired with a fast machine, you could trigger EZ Drummer in realtime... with no perceptible lag/latency. Quantum can run at 96k using a 32-sample ASIO buffer size (resulting in total round-trip latency of 1ms). At these settings, the machine has 1/3 of a millisecond to process the next buffer and get it in cue for playback. If anything interrupts this process, you'll hear glitches. This can be done, but (needless to say)... it's extremely demanding.
  9. How does adding more cores affect latency and potential clock-speed? Generally speaking: To make effective use of significantly more cores, you're talking higher buffer sizes. The more cores on the CPU, the harder it is to achieve high clock-speed Super tight enclosures mean low clock-speed (thermal limitations) Long Battery Life means low clock-speed AMD has 32 cores on 3970x Threadripper, but the all-core clock-speed is about 4GHz. Intel 10900k has 10 cores, with all-core clock-speed of 5.3GHz. At large buffer sizes, the 3970x will smoke the 10900k At smallest buffer sizes, the 10900k will smoke the 3970x In my experience, Mac laptops currently provide longer battery-life than most PC laptops. When using a laptop, I'm almost always plugged-in. 🤷‍♂️
  10. Just a couple of points: "Long Battery Life" and "High Performance" are diametrically opposed. You can have one or the other... not both. General-purpose use (Office Apps, Surfing the Internet, etc) doesn't require much in the way of CPU. ARM CPUs are already fine doing these tasks (iPads). We work with a lot of Mac users who were essentially abandoned (as power-users) by Apple. Most often they're professional composers... who need specific components in a high-performance machine; a machine that can be expanded/upgraded as need demands. The new Mac Pro??? 7k for the base model. Specs our composer clients need would be ~$10,000... and still not offer the same speed/performance and custom/expansion/upgrade options.
  11. 2020 has been brutal. RIP Eddy Van Halen! 😥
  12. If no MIDI data is recorded, none is arriving at the "Alesis Nitro" USB interface. Just read the User's Guide. You have to set Local Control to OFF. If it's set to ON, the pads will trigger the onboard sounds (but not send MIDI data). If it's set to off, the pads will send MIDI data. If you want to hear the Nitro sounds (while recording MIDI), make sure the MIDI track's Input Echo button is enabled.
  13. Disable unused Audio Devices. Disable Power-Management (should ideally be disable in a high-performance machine) If you use a USB audio interface (and power-management isn't disabled), Windows can decide to turn off that USB port (to save power)... causing the audio interface to disconnect.
  14. I can understand "hiding" certain aspects via Workspaces (to avoid visual clutter). I can't see logic in completely "locking-out" features not visible. IMO, keyboard shortcuts should still bring up desired views/etc.
  15. First, I'd make sure MIDI data is getting from the drum brain to Cakewalk. Open a new empty test project Add a MIDI track Set the MIDI track's input to Alesis Nitro>MIDI Omni Record-arm the MIDI track Record a few seconds of playing the Alesis Nitro If no MIDI data was recorded, that means MIDI data is not flowing out of the Alesis Nitro brain into Cakewalk. Check the Alesis Nitro to make sure it's set to transmit MIDI data via USB.
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