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Orange Tree Samples releases "Evolution Baritone Electric" for Kontakt Player with Intro Offer

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Orange Tree Samples has released Evolution Baritone Electric, a baritone electric guitar sample library powered by Native Instruments' Kontakt Player. They say:

Evolution Baritone Electric captures the sound of a baritone electric guitar with a long scale length and single-coil lipstick pickups. We recorded the neck and bridge pickup signals separately, giving you control over their blend for an additional dimension of tonal flexibility. The bridge pickup gives you that classic twang, while the neck pickup delivers a warm, woody sound.

Evolution Baritone Electric is based on our Evolution engine, which provides you with a customizable mapping system, chords and strumming patterns, and a collection of built-in effects. The library includes ready-to-use factory presets for a variety of classic and modern baritone guitar tones.

Evolution Baritone Electric was developed in collaboration with Rosewood Recording Company in Utah. Guy Randle, the owner and recording engineer at Rosewood Recording Company, incorporated analog audio equipment to emphasize desirable tonal qualities of the guitar. Evolution Baritone Electric includes both the as-recorded signal as well as an enhanced signal.

Key features:

Nearly 12,000 samples totaling 10.5 GB of uncompressed samples.

Articulations such as sustains, palm mutes, mutes, natural harmonics, plus special effects like string slaps, muted strums, divebombs, and others.

Legato samples for slides, hammer-ons, and pull-offs.

Built-in pattern editor for strumming and picking.

Adjustable pick position using our proprietary physical modeling technology.

Intro Price: $139 until December 14th, 2022 (Reg. $179).

https://www.orangetreesamples.com/products/evolution-baritone-electric

 

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Hmmm, this is an instant buy for me since I have everything else. But I can't tell what my bundle-upgrade price will be cuz I'm on my "other" computer right now and don't remember my password.

OK, I'm on my music computer now and it's $75 to complete MY guitar bundle with Orange slices.

Edited by fret_man
latest price

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Was FREE for me as an upgrade to the Electric Bundle.

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18 minutes ago, Bapu said:

Was FREE for me as an upgrade to the Electric Bundle.

That was due to a mistake on my end when inputting the pricing for that bundle. I've since fixed that on the website, in case anybody else is wondering why they're unable to get a free upgrade like you did. I guess just count it as an early Christmas present. :)

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52 minutes ago, Greg Schlaepfer said:

I guess just count it as an early Christmas present. :)

Or Bapu's Super Loyalty Reward (BSLR), Thanks Greg.

Edited by Bapu
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The Bapu abides and rightly so. 
That said, this is a wonderful new creation, perfect for my Bach counterpoint project. 

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I honestly don't know much about baritone guitar, but I really love the sounds. A bunch of you guys that commented play guitar and although I know Greg, I was just wondering, because I'm a pretend guitarist, what are the types of situations where you  would you reach for a baritone guitar? I understand how it sounds, and listening to the video I'm getting ideas for how I could use it and I'm thinking of songs I've heard this kind of guitar in and it sounds like what I recall hearing in a bunch of 90s alt rock, the band "Live" immediately comes to mind, also southern rock (yes, a kid from Chicago also grew up loving Skynyrd and the Allman Brothers as well as prog rock, Coltrane,  Marvin Gaye,  Stevie Wonder and Chopin and lots of other stuff that doesn't seem to fit),  specifically I'm thinking this is the kind of guitar that gave Mollly Hatchet their edgy guitar sound. But those are just hunches.  I'd love to learn from people who actually play guitar.  If anyone has drum questions, I'm happy to return the favor!

UPDATE: I just read two articles and learned a bunch of songs I wouldn't have thought of, like a Cure song,  use the baritone guitar and one song I've always loved that doesn't fit with any other styles mentioned above,  Glen Campbell's "Witchita Lineman. "

https://www.guitarguitar.co.uk/news/140617/

Edited by PavlovsCat
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59 minutes ago, fret_man said:

I'll be using it when I need that low growl.

Mainly just for riffs or for entire rhythm guitar parts throughout a song? 

Edited by PavlovsCat

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2 hours ago, Fleer said:

This Picture Perfect vid is … pretty perfect: 

 

I watched it from start to finish before I posted and listened to all the examples. The reason I still had questions was basically,  while I know what it sounds like from the video and I was mentally comparing the sounds to what I've heard in songs, as a fake guitarist, I'm trying to get an idea of the various types of situations where a real guitarist would use it so I can try that out. The articles I read since originally posting really helped. But I'd still love to get insights from anyone here. 

An example of something I just read I want to try was using the guitar for layering guitar parts in different octaves. 

https://www.musicindustryhowto.com/baritone-guitar/

I thought it was pretty wild to read a song I loved since I was a wee lad (Witchita Lineman) used a baritone guitar,  because before listening to the video,  my thoughts were the guitar was mainly suited for very aggressive music. Is Glen Campbell playing a baritone guitar on this version of "Witchita Lineman"? (I love this version even more than the original,  ) 

 

Edited by PavlovsCat
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I play a Warmoth baritone strat almost exclusively. Sometimes play a heavily modded American Deluxe w/ the standard 25.5 scale. The baritone is a 28 5/8" scale w/ a Wilkinson trem and I string it w/ light baritone strings so it feels closer to a standard 25.5 scale strat, and I tune to Bb (technically A#) just like my 5 string bass, which is also a long scale @ 35". (I also tune my standard 25.5 scale strat to Eb, so it's "in tune" w/ my baritone and 5-string bass). I've always liked tuning low as I grew up listening to Alice in Chains and Dream Theater. Jerry Cantrell just used really heavy gauge strings on a regular scale guitar to tune down to C, but John Petrucci later played a seven string Ibanez w/ that low B. I don't really like seven string guitars; I like the feel of the six string and the extra snap and twang I get from the longer scale. I get a kick out of people who look at my baritone strat, which at first glance looks just like a regular strat, except there's something about it they can't quite put their finger on.. lol it's that the neck is extra long. Robert Smith (Cure) plays a Bass 6, which is that fender Jazzmaster thingy with something like a 30" scale neck iirc, and like the Dan Electro baritones they have pretty thick baritone strings, so he kind of does a tic-tac bass thing with it, and of course some country and cowboy western players like the baritone for that deep twang. But I treat and play my baritone as if it were a regular strat that just happens to be tuned down to B flat, and because I use light baritone strings it plays more like a standard scale strat too, so I'm able to bend and do all that. Still there is a bit more tension there even w/ the light baritone strings and your fingers get strong playing like that. You have to remember Stevie Ray Vaughan played a regular scale strat with 12's and I heard sometimes 13's. I tried 12s on my regular strat and it was much stiffer than the light baritone strings on my baritone. 

There goes a picture of the first (white) Warmoth baritone I built close to 20 years ago. And a picture of a new baritone I'm   currently building. The seafoam green body is from Warmoth and the baritone tele neck is from Musiccraft.

Screenshot_20221201-195018_Gallery.jpg

Screenshot_20221201-195109_Gallery.jpg

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Wow,  thanks, @Christian Jones.  I love Alice in Chains and The Cure back on the day (my musical tastes are all over the map) and I love "Pull Me Under" and some Dream Theatre here and there (but especially love their playing).  One thing I'm thinking is that my lack of mixing skills might mean I'll need to learn something new to manage the low end if I heavily use a baritone guitar for rhythm parts,  because I could imagine issues with the bass part. So now I have some ideas and I'm going to back to some songs with baritone guitar and pay attention to how they use it and try to write a song with baritone guitar in mind.  And oops, I'll go listen to all of the Orange Tree Samples demos.

I took years of piano,  organ and drum lessons and a handful of guitar lessons,  so I really don't know jack about guitars beyond knowing guitarists do stuff like alternative turning, but I don't remember playing with guitarists using a baritone guitar,  but maybe someone did and I simply had no idea. But I am pretty fascinated about experimenting with this and I'm good at coming up with guitar riffs,  so I think I'm going to start there, laying down a drum groove and trying riffs over that. Thanks again for the insights, Christian. 

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Has anyone had a Danelectro bari guitar that lasted more than five years of regular use? I had one, it was fragile, the pots got scratchy, the body was made of some balsa/ foam combo? Loved the growly sound, however.

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I have a danelectro longhorn bass. It's only been a year so far.

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Danelectro longhorns always looked a little to stabby for my comfort.
Could easily picture losing an eye or ***** due to a stage accident.  😳

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The other reason baritone guitars are used is to play in "lower" keys without changing the higher key chord shapes that work well for the song. For example, suppose you play a song with G, C, and D chords. But then, for some reason, you need to play that in a lower key, like E. With a baritone (and a capo), you can keep the same left hand chord fingering patterns but the sound coming out is in a lower key. The chord "sound/inversion" still sounds right.

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4 hours ago, TheSteven said:

Danelectro longhorns always looked a little to stabby for my comfort.
Could easily picture losing an eye or ***** due to a stage accident.  😳

I once knew a guy who knew a guy who lost his ***** in a stage accident.  It took the band's roadies over an hour to find it and by then it was too late to even attempt to re-attach it, so the guy had to live with a prosthetic ***** for the rest of his life. Tragic. 

Disclosure: I have no idea what ***** stands for. I just think letting people speculate what you're referring to is hilarious. 

I'll show myself out...

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