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PavlovsCat

Hey Joe - JIMI HENDRIX Cover

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This was my impromptu one-man jam session version of "Hey Joe." I didn't play the entire song, but as much as I felt up to at the time and I think it came out pretty decent considering that until last year, I had stopped playing music for more than 20 years due to a repetitive stress injury that limits me to playing to just a few minutes at a time before pain sets in. It's definitely not a brilliant performance, but I thought, considering everything, I did a decent job. 

I could really use advice on how to fix the vocals from regularly abruptly popping in. I realize the effect on my vocal will probably be annoying to a lot of people, but my vocal was so boring, I thought it made things a little more interesting. 
 

Edited by PavlovsCat
Grammatical edit and attempted to fix a broken link.
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The link didn't work, so I popped over to your SC page to listen.

Nice cover - I like it. Some great guitar work in there too.

Splitting the vocals so wide is quite unusual - it was a little distracting. I didn't really notice the vocals popping in, but I did feel they disappeared quite quickly after each phrase; almost like there's a noise gate that's chopping the tail off with quite a fast attack. It's sounds ok, but in response to your question: if you're not doing so, I'd recommend passing the vocals through an optical compressor quite gently. Maybe add a little reverb here too to give the vocals a little tail*. Then maybe compressing the whole mix a little (again quite gently) on the master bus to help glue the elements together.

Maybe before any compression, also use an EQ and roll off the lower frequencies on the vocal - this will help to not trigger the compressors with the bass content.

Nothing wrong with how it sounds now though - well done!

*Remember that the tails of a reverb are what's heard, and that the bass of the reverb has a tendency to muddy up a mix; if you put the reverb on a separate bus, put an EQ after it to roll off some lows if things start sounding mushy.

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6 minutes ago, antler said:

The link didn't work, so I popped over to your SC page to listen.

Nice cover - I like it. Some great guitar work in there too.

Splitting the vocals so wide is quite unusual - it was a little distracting. I didn't really notice the vocals popping in, but I did feel they disappeared quite quickly after each phrase; almost like there's a noise gate that's chopping the tail off with quite a fast attack. It's sounds ok, but in response to your question: if you're not doing so, I'd recommend passing the vocals through an optical compressor quite gently. Maybe add a little reverb here too to give the vocals a little tail*. Then maybe compressing the whole mix a little (again quite gently) on the master bus to help glue the elements together.

Maybe before any compression, also use an EQ and roll off the lower frequencies on the vocal - this will help to not trigger the compressors with the bass content.

Nothing wrong with how it sounds now though - well done!

*Remember that the tails of a reverb are what's heard, and that the bass of the reverb has a tendency to muddy up a mix; if you put the reverb on a separate bus, put an EQ after it to roll off some lows if things start sounding mushy.

Thanks for the kind words and helpful advice. I'm going to put it to use this weekend. BTW, the guitars and bass are Orange Tree Samples libraries played from my midi keyboard in real-time. 

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I keep replacing the original file with an updated file and the forum has issues finding it after the original is replaced for some reason. Here's the working link. I changed some things on the vocal effects and mix and added in some reverse guitar parts near the end of the song that I thought helped the vibe I was going for. This was all really just a one-man jam session. 
 

 

Edited by PavlovsCat
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I know the Haas effect on the vocal was intentional, but just one thing to keep in mind: the 'important' elements in a mix (e.g. kick, bass, etc) are usually centred for two reasons:

  • Mono compatibility
  • They will automatically be louder in stereo because you have two speakers playing the centre signal in phase

I think the vocals could do with being brought up a bit more in the mix, but otherwise it's sounding great. The guitars sound great too - glad I picked up a few in the OTS group buy a little earlier 😁

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That was a very cool and very unique interpretation. Really relaxed and low-key in spite of the nature of the lyrics. And when it cut down to just a piano bit at the very end that was awesome.

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36 minutes ago, bdickens said:

That was a very cool and very unique interpretation. Really relaxed and low-key in spite of the nature of the lyrics. And when it cut down to just a piano bit at the very end that was awesome.

Wow, thanks so much. You have no idea how good it feels to hear that.  The piano part came from around ten minutes of me jamming on the progression the first time I tried to play it. I had a lot cooler parts, but the timing was all over the place, so I just took the first several bars and put it on the end. 

As I've shared here and there, I used to be a really good drummer (my first instrument is piano and I was trained on piano, organ, guitar and drums), and I had played publicly from age 4 - 29 when I experienced a repetitive stress injury that caused painful tendonitis that results in pain after even half a minute of playing to a few minutes, depending on the complexity/type of movement (a quick arpeggio results in instant pain, eighth notes on a cymbal or hi hat at a tempo of 90 or more gets me pain within a minute; I can't really do an extended single stroke roll cleanly for a decent length of time). So I stopped playing or even practicing back in 1999.  I had some local (midwest) success as a drummer before then with a regionally popular band that got airplay on college radio that resulted in getting some local recognition (Jimmy Chamberlin of the Smashing Pumpkins came up to me at one of his gigs in front of two of my bandmates and told me I was one of his favorite drummers; Louise Post of Veruca Salt wanted me to join Veruca Salt maybe 5 years before my injury).  So abruptly stopping playing was hard to handle and I threw myself into my day job where I experienced a good deal of recognition, but, of course, it meant little in comparison to music. Last year, during lockdown, I bought my teenage son a midi  keyboard and showed him how to use Cakewalk., I also showed him how to play some Beatles songs and that's where I realized that I could play really simple songs for maybe 10 or 15 minutes on piano without encountering too much pain.  I decided to get a new DAW computer  -- I own a bunch of midi keyboards and V-Drums -- and just jammed on "I Am the Walrus." I recorded the first take of me on the electric piano and used that to build the below cover. 
 

 

Edited by PavlovsCat

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