Jump to content
Johnbee58

Hearing Loss (UPDATE) 1/26/22

Recommended Posts

20 hours ago, slartabartfast said:

The point of a vascular scan in evaluating pulsatile tinnitus is to rule out a more significant cause of the symptom, which may indicate a narrowing or aneurism of an artery in the head and neck. In such cases the sound is really sound (as opposed to a audio-neurologic dysfunction) that is actually being picked up via conduction through tissue. Congestion of the nose/sinuses, to the extent that it includes eustacean tube dysfunction may relate to the symptom in that it impedes the motion of the eardrum and ossicles , and thus makes otherwise subliminal sound more noticeable--like sitting in a very quiet room makes it easier to hear your breath and heartbeat. As to the dental surgery, it is difficult to relate the symptom to the local anesthetic, but the aftermath would produce enough pain to cause you to adjust the pressure on jaw/pharynx  that might affect the openings of the  eustacean tubes, but that is entirely speculative.

 

And here we all thought you were a lawyer. 😁

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 57Gregy said:

And here we all thought you were a lawyer. 😁

No I am a real MD (New York Medical College 1977).

I just play a lawyer on social media.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, slartabartfast said:

No I am a real MD (New York Medical College 1977).

I just play a lawyer on social media.

 Back when doctors were actually taught how to make people better!  Noice.  🙂

 

The unfortunate newer approach...

Politics-MedicalPriorities.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/27/2022 at 3:18 PM, slartabartfast said:

The point of a vascular scan in evaluating pulsatile tinnitus is to rule out a more significant cause of the symptom, which may indicate a narrowing or aneurism of an artery in the head and neck. In such cases the sound is really sound (as opposed to a audio-neurologic dysfunction) that is actually being picked up via conduction through tissue. Congestion of the nose/sinuses, to the extent that it includes eustacean tube dysfunction may relate to the symptom in that it impedes the motion of the eardrum and ossicles , and thus makes otherwise subliminal sound more noticeable--like sitting in a very quiet room makes it easier to hear your breath and heartbeat. As to the dental surgery, it is difficult to relate the symptom to the local anesthetic, but the aftermath would produce enough pain to cause you to adjust the pressure on jaw/pharynx  that might affect the openings of the  eustacean tubes, but that is entirely speculative.

 

This is intriguing.  After reading this I did some research on how this might be corrected.  If it is an aneurysm, that might mean that the carotid artery would be blocked, or close to it, which could lead to my suffering a stroke.  The remedy would be a surgical procedure called a carotid endarterectomy which would involve them surgically opening my carotid to unblock it.  I've read that the complications (of the surgery) could include nerve problems that could effect the eyes, ear, nose or tongue and could lead to a heart attack or stroke anyway.  So, it might come down to losing my hearing even more as well as other implications.  Either that or face the possibility of losing my life (or quality of) to a stroke.  Seriously, if I lost my ability to enjoy music I'd almost rather be dead.  Am I making more out of this than it really would be? Thanks for your input.

🙂

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Johnbee58 said:

This is intriguing.  After reading this I did some research on how this might be corrected.  If it is an aneurysm, that might mean that the carotid artery would be blocked, or close to it, which could lead to my suffering a stroke.  The remedy would be a surgical procedure called a carotid endarterectomy which would involve them surgically opening my carotid to unblock it.  I've read that the complications (of the surgery) could include nerve problems that could effect the eyes, ear, nose or tongue and could lead to a heart attack or stroke anyway.  So, it might come down to losing my hearing even more as well as other implications.  Either that or face the possibility of losing my life (or quality of) to a stroke.  Seriously, if I lost my ability to enjoy music I'd almost rather be dead.  Am I making more out of this than it really would be? Thanks for your input.

🙂

 

Try not to let the carotid artery thing worry you. The carotid artery hearing thing is common. I have it. It's causing a low pitched hum in my left ear. I can actually make the humming go away if I shake my head back and forth really fast like I'm twitching. I've had scans in my legs and they did the carotid too and I have zero blockages. In my case it's the sound of the blood being transferred by bone fusing from infections.

Right now I can't hear any low end out of my right ear. I found out my ear drum is collapsed again even though I have a permanent tube. They were in a foul mood that day and very rushed due to covid related staff shortages and he didn't have time to address it. 😟 I have to go back again in July. It's driving me nuts because it hurts and I can't hear anything below around 1K in my right ear. I'm assuming the low freq. loss is due to the collapse. If not I'm screwed. 

After all that though he tells me my hearing is great especially for 50 and being in a band 16 years straight. It's above average for others my age. What do you do.

Good luck. I hope it all turns out well for you. Did you see my thread about the NAD+ Supplement? Might want to try it. I have documented proof it improved my hearing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...