Jump to content
Notes_Norton

Does anyone else prefer hardware MIDI modules to software synths?

Recommended Posts

23 hours ago, Vernon Barnes said:

If you are lucky - I have several dead pieces of hardware. <...snip...>

I guess so. I have a dead battery on a TX81z, but I can load the patches via a data dump. I tried replacing the soldered in battery myself, which should have been a simple process, but it didn't work. It takes a minute to reload the patches so I'm not going to take the time to figure out what went wrong.

Other than that, everything works as if they were new.

Notes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Notes_Norton said:

. . . I have a dead battery on a TX81z, but I can load the patches via a data dump. I tried replacing the soldered in battery myself, which should have been a simple process, but it didn't work.

I can relate!  A few years ago I looked inside one of my Casio VZ8m modules and decided I did not have the dexterity or skills to get to the battery and replace it.  Fortunately I had backed up my patches as sysex banks in pre-Cakewalk ProAudio *.wrk files--and they still work!

Can't do that with a VSTi/DXi that no longer works simply because its old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I'm going to be recording a lot, I keep the TX81z plugged into the UPS and turned on. That way I don't have to reload the patches every day.

For my favorite solo modules, (Yamaha VL70m), I have the patches burned into ROM and inserted into the units. Some engineers in a wind synthesizer group I belong to figured out how to do that.

That's great because the VL is a physical modeling synth. It models cup mouthpieces, single reed mouthpieces, double reeds, picked strings, bowed strings and so on. Then sends that to the various resonator models, tubes, cones, boxes, etc. After that to the dampers, bells, bridges, and so on.

The result is a synthesized instrument that plays, feels, and sounds like a sax, guitar, flute, violin, trumpet, trombone, harmonica and so on.

This is one sound module I would hate to lose because there is nothing close, either hardware or software. I take them on the gig with me and use them with my Wind MIDI controller.

Notes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought one of these a long time ago... actually I traded in my YAS-32 sax for it (still regret that :(  ) - but it's great for both saving/restoring patches & also playing sequences.

image.png.871d8b5bae7d7d7d49a00665a3c6c3f7.png

It also worked great in the studio. I could sequence all my keys at home, "bounce" it to the data-disk then sync it up to the BRC in an ADAT system. Random access to anywhere in the song on the ADAT worked a treat. The only downside was manually entering tempo maps into the BRC.

For live, I'd store each song as a combination of sysex/patch changes so that my whole rig was set up exactly how I wanted in around 2-3 secs.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been programming a Montage for live use... and have really been enjoying the synth-engine.

Unlike past units, there's no separate "single-patch" and "multi-patch" paradigm.

All patches are "Performances".  Each performance can use up to 8 internal parts (individual sounds).

Each individual sound can be comprised of up to 8 "elements" (oscillators)... with some advanced triggering/switching options.

Not as flexible as Kontakt, but you can setup some advanced/detailed sounds.

If you're working with your own samples, John Melas' "Waveform Editor" is a tremendous help... as is Sample Robot.

 

I like having a balance of hardware and software synths.

Each have strengths/weaknesses.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2020 at 11:13 AM, msmcleod said:

I bought one of these a long time ago... actually I traded in my YAS-32 sax for it (still regret that :(  ) - but it's great for both saving/restoring patches & also playing sequences.

image.png.871d8b5bae7d7d7d49a00665a3c6c3f7.png

It also worked great in the studio. I could sequence all my keys at home, "bounce" it to the data-disk then sync it up to the BRC in an ADAT system. Random access to anywhere in the song on the ADAT worked a treat. The only downside was manually entering tempo maps into the BRC.

For live, I'd store each song as a combination of sysex/patch changes so that my whole rig was set up exactly how I wanted in around 2-3 secs.

I owned one of those (years ago).

Used it a lot...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...