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craigb

Has anyone tried using a virtual machine for their DAW?

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6 hours ago, Gswitz said:

@craigb

I haven't read most of this thread, but if you are looking for how to use a laptop that you don't own to make recordings, I suggest Ubuntu Studio installed on a USB hard drive. Boot the computer to the USB drive and make your recording.

If you have a Class Compliant USB Interface it should work fine.

It isn't Cakewalk, but it's easy and portable.

No, just going to need a new, main PC soon and was seeing if I could combine uses (as always!).

I need to do some serious data crunching soon (a Windows program I'm writing that will data-mine a database I created) and I need to be able to have 4k output in both landscape and portrait modes.  I think I'm just going to start with a DIY over-powered full tower with a lot of RAM and a temporary graphics card, then update later as GPU's become more available.  Then, after a few (a lot of?) paychecks, think about creating a dedicated DAW with Jim Roseberry.

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On 4/11/2021 at 6:34 PM, craigb said:

No, just going to need a new, main PC soon and was seeing if I could combine uses (as always!).

I need to do some serious data crunching soon (a Windows program I'm writing that will data-mine a database I created) and I need to be able to have 4k output in both landscape and portrait modes.  I think I'm just going to start with a DIY over-powered full tower with a lot of RAM and a temporary graphics card, then update later as GPU's become more available.  Then, after a few (a lot of?) paychecks, think about creating a dedicated DAW with Jim Roseberry.

If it's a real database you're using, you won't need to do THAT much "data crunching" if you write your query correctly and efficiently.

It's like fingernails on a chalkboard when I hear about people basically unloading database tables just so they can do manual math or formatting operations on the data.  That's what a database engine is for, people; to allow you to process data without losing its logical interconnectedness!

If on the other hand, you're just pulling data out of a file that you CALL a database because you didn't know any better, well then just carry on.  Flat files and spreadsheets are not databases, but I get the mistake.  :)

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I got Sonar Producer 8.5 running on a WinXP (32-bit) VM in VirtualBox. :)

The memory is virtualized, as is the CPU, graphics and audio.

Good news! Got the USB pass-thru working so that I could attach a USB MIDI controller to the host and assign it in Sonar running in the VM.

But I'm pretty sure the latency in this sort of setup is shit. For actual use I would probably go with dual boot and direct connect my MIDI and audio interfaces to the real world, LOL!

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3 hours ago, Positively Charged said:

If it's a real database you're using, you won't need to do THAT much "data crunching" if you write your query correctly and efficiently.

It's like fingernails on a chalkboard when I hear about people basically unloading database tables just so they can do manual math or formatting operations on the data.  That's what a database engine is for, people; to allow you to process data without losing its logical interconnectedness!

If on the other hand, you're just pulling data out of a file that you CALL a database because you didn't know any better, well then just carry on.  Flat files and spreadsheets are not databases, but I get the mistake.  :)

It's a real SQL Server database, but the part that will be intensive will be taking thousands of rows for each of over 4,000 objects, making mathematically different copies that get stored back to the database (same table, different "type"), then doing that once more before comparing each of these final objects to each other.  That's part one.  The next part will first create a similar amount of data (but for about a dozen different types of objects).  These will be combined in a few different ways (some are still TBD), then each of these will also get compared to each of the original 4,000 objects!  If this phase produces results, the next one will have millions of rows for many of those objects.

Funny you should mention about spreadsheets and flat files not being databases.  I once had a manager who "thought" he knew what he was talking about (LMAO!) and he would definitely call any collection of data a database!  

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8 minutes ago, craigb said:

  I once had a manager who "thought" he knew what he was talking about (LMAO!) and he would definitely call any collection of data a database!  

I agree. The spreadsheets (flat files) are actually tables of data, that once properly connected to each other, can become a database. :)

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