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LNovik@aol.com

good reverbs for vocals

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Hi,

I used to use PerfectSpace for Vocals, but when I was recently getting clicking on my tracks, it was pointed out to me that this program is for 32 bit, and I have a 64 bit pc. I have tried some of the other reverbs that I had from purchasing Producer X3 in the past. While they are fine, at least the presets don't wow me. I realize it might be because I'm not tweaking enough, but it would be nice to have some good 64 bit compatible preset reverbs I could choose from. Can anyone recommend some excellent reverbs for vocals, either included with some Cakewalk programs or 3rd party plug ins that are reasonably priced. 

Thanks.

LNovik

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There are some really nice freebies out there!! Search on Dragonfly reverbs and there is a pack of 4 different styles of reverbs in the download. Orilriver is another great freebie. These two come to mind.

Since you work with Perfect Space you are probably at ease working with IRs. One of my favorite affordable reverbs is Melda Productions!

There is a free version in the free pack of plugins that is wonderful because it allows you to use any of your own IRs! I had a huge library of IRs from using Perfect Space myself for many years and they all load and work perfectly in Melda. Once you try it, there is a pay version with more controls available. Either way, the freebie or the pay version, the Melda Productions reverbs are a keeper!

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Meldamoonie here, but not a regular user of convolution reverbs. (I'll drop a heads-up here to suggest Meldaproductions Free Bundle fans keep an eye on their website, as we're coming into a time of the year when Vojtech runs one of his "everything half-off" sales, when you can upgrade the Free Bundle for about $25)

How does the one in Cakewalk's ProChannel stack up against other ones of this type?

To the OP, my favorite reverb for anything is iZotope/Exponential Audio Phoenix Stereo Reverb, which I got on sale for $10. iZotope have now come out with a reverb of their own based on the Exponential algorithms, called Neoverb. I don't know what you consider reasonably priced, but right now it's a $99 crossgrade from any iZotope product at Pluginboutique.

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Rematrix Solo is the convo verb in Prochannel. I have had stellar results with it. So.much so, I reach for it much more than the full Overloud verb included in Cake.

There is a very nice free version of ReMatrix that includes the presets from Solo. A lot more control over the IRs than Solo.

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Abbey Roads plates $41 right now on waves.com. Great reverb - a little CPU hungry but very nice.

H-Reverb Hybrid Reverb - way more versatile than AR $38 now.

https://www.waves.com/

 

One of my new favorites lately is Vocal Finalizer by Noise Ash  $29 now (Usually $129) - It's great sounding reverb designed for vocals but it also has a De'esser, a Doubler (Pitch shifting), an Echo, "Vocal" Compression, Stereo Width (Spatial spread), and an EQ  - They are all set up and designed specifically for vocals.  It is VERY cpu friendly.

https://www.noiseash.com/vocal-finalizer/

 

I  Also love the Vahalla products. They have three free effects you could to try them out to see if you like the Valhalla sound. They remind me of my Lexicon PCM reverbs

Super Massive is free has been used in many of my new projects. I would have even bought it.  It's great.

Free - 

https://valhalladsp.com/shop/reverb/valhalla-supermassive/

 

Main Page

https://valhalladsp.com/

 

 

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Yes, but what about reverb?

Just joking; what a wonderful array of suggestions to think of. Thank you all. To clarify just 2 abbreviations, which I can't  seem to find completely:

"IR," used by Sidney Earl Goodroe, when he said: Since you work with Perfect Space you are probably at ease working with IRs. I guess, after looking it up, IR, simply put, means: an impulse response is an audio file that contains a capture of the inherent sonic characteristics of a piece of gear, acoustic environment, or playback system. I was going to ask what other types of plug in reverb are out there, but I really don't need to know that. I just wanted to know if an IR reverb means anything practical for my needs, though I would guess not. 

Secondly, Starship Krupa says, To the OP, my favorite reverb for anything is....Can't seem to find what "OP" means.

Thanks again for all of the feedback.

LNovik

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A +1 for the Waves Abbey road plates and chambers. The main drawback is they are very CPU hungry but they sound wonderful.

I have a Eastwest composer cloud subscription and their Spaces II is my goto convolution.  A tad expensive if you want to buy it though.

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Some footnotes:

(1) Not recommending Perfect Space over any of the others, but somehow I have the 32-bit version in Cakewalk. It works on my 64 bit PC. 

(2) If you like Melda's MConvolutionEZ reverb (free or licensed version), they have a Multi-Band version (paid): MConvolutionMB.  

Not saying these would meet your needs, just adding some information that I didn't see above in case it helps with you decision making.

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9 hours ago, LNovik@aol.com said:

"IR," used by Sidney Earl Goodroe, when he said: Since you work with Perfect Space you are probably at ease working with IRs. I guess, after looking it up, IR, simply put, means: an impulse response is an audio file that contains a capture of the inherent sonic characteristics of a piece of gear, acoustic environment, or playback system. I was going to ask what other types of plug in reverb are out there, but I really don't need to know that. I just wanted to know if an IR reverb means anything practical for my needs, though I would guess not.

You got the IR part correct, as in "impulse response". Used by one of the two loosely defined main types of digital reverbs that use mathematics to process a signal,  these are known as "convolution" reverbs. Good at reproducing the "space" that was captured in the IR. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convolution_reverb

The other main type of digital reverb is "algorithmic". These are probably more common, and what you usually think of as a reverb. It is capable  of emulating plates, echo chambers, springs, room sizes, delays, or pretty much anything else in the time domain.

Here's an interesting digital reverb article from iZotope: https://www.izotope.com/en/learn/what-digital-reverb-actually-does.html

 

Edited by abacab

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