Jump to content
Starise

Future Macs ARM , and The Intel answer

Recommended Posts

48 minutes ago, InstrEd said:

@Will_Kaydo  now that would be a really nice set-up.

@InstrEd Two of these next to each other build into my desk, with that main monitor against the wall -- definitely happening as soon as Surface Studio 3 drops. 😢

images.jpeg.d07db0f322a25125255a8f5d600705c6.jpeg

Sonar-X2a.jpg.836719b058f65c4a38ef7cbb47ea069e.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So.... looking at this thread had me thinking again about Apple and their business practices. How those business practices are going to impact my business in the long run. And it really comes down to this.

I’m going to have to see how this all shakes out.
 

As a Pro Tools and Logic Pro based studio, Catalina (MAC OS X 10.15), caused issues with both DAW and plug-in developers. To the point that the migration to 64 bit code threw a wrench into Pro Tools for 6 months. It also created havoc within Apple’s own Logic Pro X for nearly 6 weeks. I decided to wait and see where things were going to shake out. (I still haven’t moved to Catalina and will skip it all together).
 

Here is the down side for me. At any given time I keep one machine in production environment and one machine in test. Meaning I will test any updates to OS, DAW and plugins in the test environment on personal projects. Once I’ve got a good idea of what bugs to expect and that there aren’t any session killers in the setup it gets moved to production. 
 

So where does that leave me?

It leaves me with two concerns:

1) How much are two machines going to set me back? Meaning machines that will meet my minimum specs to run a full Pro Tools Ultimate mix session with up to 384 voices. Or, a LPX project with up to 500 tracks with plugins. (Yes that’s happened).

2) What if any of my studio gear will need to be replaced due to lack of support or incompatibility? I’m certain my standby Focusrite Clarett will have to be swapped out at some point. (The Clarett series being a bit long in the tooth these days). But what about my so called future proofed Focusrite Red series? How future proof is it really in the scheme of Apple’s change?

There’s a bit of an expense that both hobbyists and pros alike have to consider whilst Apple goes about its changes to its master plan. Then there’s this whole Thunderbolt 3 issue that has many Mac users holding a dongle both literally and figuratively.

A company that once treasured its “creative” user base has managed to frustrate that user base to no end over the last 8 years. (The observation is that Apple has lost it’s way under Tim Cook - my opinion).

Edited by Doc H

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like all corporations, Apple needs to have perpetual growth for its stockholders. Apple has IMO always incorporated planned obsolescence as a major part of that. Of course, they are not the only corporation to do that.

That isn't necessarily a criticism, just an observation.

Insights and incites by Notes

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/10/2020 at 5:54 AM, Doc H said:

So.... looking at this thread had me thinking again about Apple and their business practices. How those business practices are going to impact my business in the long run. And it really comes down to this.

I’m going to have to see how this all shakes out.
 

As a Pro Tools and Logic Pro based studio, Catalina (MAC OS X 10.15), caused issues with both DAW and plug-in developers. To the point that the migration to 64 bit code threw a wrench into Pro Tools for 6 months. It also created havoc within Apple’s own Logic Pro X for nearly 6 weeks. I decided to wait and see where things were going to shake out. (I still haven’t moved to Catalina and will skip it all together).
 

Here is the down side for me. At any given time I keep one machine in production environment and one machine in test. Meaning I will test any updates to OS, DAW and plugins in the test environment on personal projects. Once I’ve got a good idea of what bugs to expect and that there aren’t any session killers in the setup it gets moved to production. 
 

So where does that leave me?

It leaves me with two concerns:

1) How much are two machines going to set me back? Meaning machines that will meet my minimum specs to run a full Pro Tools Ultimate mix session with up to 384 voices. Or, a LPX project with up to 500 tracks with plugins. (Yes that’s happened).

2) What if any of my studio gear will need to be replaced due to lack of support or incompatibility? I’m certain my standby Focusrite Clarett will have to be swapped out at some point. (The Clarett series being a bit long in the tooth these days). But what about my so called future proofed Focusrite Red series? How future proof is it really in the scheme of Apple’s change?

There’s a bit of an expense that both hobbyists and pros alike have to consider whilst Apple goes about its changes to its master plan. Then there’s this whole Thunderbolt 3 issue that has many Mac users holding a dongle both literally and figuratively.

A company that once treasured its “creative” user base has managed to frustrate that user base to no end over the last 8 years. (The observation is that Apple has lost it’s way under Tim Cook - my opinion).

It seems you have a very good strategy for eliminating potential issues by using a tester machine although a potentially expensive option. Bypassing Catalina was also a good call in my opinion. I would suggest two things if it were me...

First I would use a "wait and see" approach since Apple users are being told right now the older computers and OS will continue to be supported for as long as 5 years out.

Secondly, I would  be shopping other replacement  options, especially if I hear that things aren't going so well much past the "growing pains" stage usually expected in new computer/OS release. By "other replacement options" I mean a high end PC. That is unless you are willing to manage the expense in buying a new Mac setup.

There's a good chance many Macs will continue to work ok past that 5 year mark, but no absolute guarantee. Probably no reason to be overly concerned at this point. I think I might have a Plan B just in case ( if it were me).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/11/2020 at 10:01 PM, Starise said:

It seems you have a very good strategy for eliminating potential issues by using a tester machine although a potentially expensive option. Bypassing Catalina was also a good call in my opinion. I would suggest two things if it were me...

First I would use a "wait and see" approach since Apple users are being told right now the older computers and OS will continue to be supported for as long as 5 years out.

Secondly, I would  be shopping other replacement  options, especially if I hear that things aren't going so well much past the "growing pains" stage usually expected in new computer/OS release. By "other replacement options" I mean a high end PC. That is unless you are willing to manage the expense in buying a new Mac setup.

There's a good chance many Macs will continue to work ok past that 5 year mark, but no absolute guarantee. Probably no reason to be overly concerned at this point. I think I might have a Plan B just in case ( if it were me).

I'm taking the whole wait and see approach to the whole thing. Any shift in OS platform would have to be considered carefully. I'm unfortunately (or fortunately heavily invested in the Apple platform and the accouterments thereof. Meaning Logic Pro X, Final Cut Pro X and Motion 5. My Pro Tools license doesn't care about platform though I have to say it has been a more stable platform when looking at my colleagues who elected to use PCs for Pro Tools. Not that it can't be done.

I use multiple machines and a test environment as a matter of survivability as a business (Something I learned form my days as a field sales engineer in IT). When one goes down I have to have a back up to go to. I can't tell a client that I can't complete their mix or their arrangement due to some hardware issue that they really aren't going to take into consideration. It's either  the work is done or its not to them.

For me it comes down to the workflow improvements that have come to Pro Tools over the last two years. It's a good sight better than it had been in previous years. And I have the portability factor that I have to consider when I take work from outside my studio and bring it in.

Still a wait and see situation though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Inwardly I'm thinking, How does he get all of these clients?  I guess I've never put shingle up. ( no need to attempt to share that here). 

Seems a very solid plan. Sometime I wish I had migrated more in that direction. While I have several Mac/PC cross platform software programs, I'm mostly using a PC. 

I had not heard of how well PT is working in the most recent versions of it on Mac.  This was somewhat of a surprise. I knew PT went through some growing pains not  long ago. Looks like they hung in there. At one point I thought they were going to go bankrupt. Cubase OTOH seems to be working better on PC. Apparently many Mac users were crossing over who used that DAW with regularity. Knowing Cubase, they might have worked through many of those bugs by now.

If you already have the investment seems to make the most sense to hang tight, at least for the near future. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...