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Jack Stoner

Speed up mixed song?

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Is it possible, with either the old Sonar Plat or new CbB to speed up, slightly, a mixed down song?  I realize it will no longer be in standard tuning, just needs to be slightly faster.

 

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Why would you think the tuning would change? It wont if you click CTL /Shift at the same time (SPLAT)while dragging the left bottom corner (left or right to speed or slow down) of the clip. you can and the tuning will be the same. In Sonar PLat its CTL/ALT and you drag the bottom right corner.

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I tried both of your suggested CTL/Shift and CTL/ALT in Sonar Plat and CbB and neither changed the tempo (speeded up) the mixed down analog song.  

 

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Jack Stoner said:

Is it possible, with either the old Sonar Plat or new CbB to speed up, slightly, a mixed down song?  I realize it will no longer be in standard tuning, just needs to be slightly faster.

Are you talking about shrinking the play time of a finished stereo track (opposite of stretching it) without changing the pitch?  (For example, taking a song with a play time of 3'58" and making it to fit 3'05" ?)

Possible solution removed because there's a better [easier, quicker] one posted below. 

 

Edited by User 905133
(2) to remove a non-preferred solution; (1) to add a link to a >>possibly<< related solution

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I'm talking about the "Tempo".  I would like to speed it up alightly.  Maybe some specialty app is needed? and what is included with Sonar Plat and/or CbB can't do this?

 

 

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With the smart tool, CTRL+SHIFT+drag will stretch a clip speeding it up or slowing it down without affecting pitch. Here is a video showing a clip and the BPM of the clip in the loop construction view. There are a couple of other ways to stretch a clip documented here.

  1. The original BPM is 138
  2. Then using the smart tool CTRL+SHIFT+drag to 90%
  3. The BPM changed to 153.047 and the clip plays faster at the same pitch.

Note: Using the percent change the math is not exact because the value is displayed as an integer. The calculations are more precise than the percent shown.

FYI, in CbB, the stretch algorithms are set in preferences.

wcO2Ih9.gif

 

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It works from either end. Uses the same hot spots as slip edit.

2tL0XHB.gif

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I tried from the beginning and it didn't work.  I guess I didn't hold my mouth right when I was doing it. LOL

 

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5 hours ago, Jack Stoner said:

I guess I didn't hold my mouth right when I was doing it. LOL

 

It's like painting a straight line. You have to poke your tongue out by just the right amount or you can't do it.

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Note that if you want to increase the pitch slightly as well to give a brighter, "poppier" sound, that's possible too.

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Yes and your Huge Book of Cakewalk by BandLab Tips (actually the old 2 part SONAR version) was one of the resources I reviewed before posting in this thread.

 

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It would be cool if you could do the CbB users a big favor, and write The Big Book of Cakewalk by BandLab Tips - The Next Generation!

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Posted (edited)

I'm curious, to maintain pitch does it slice out sections to speed it up or double sections to slow it down or is there some other algorithm? Most speed up and slow down algorithms without a pitch change leaves some ugly artifacts.

I have a song that is a mix of audio (14 tracks) and midi. I want to speed it up from 70 bpm to 120 bpm. That's a lot.

EDIT:  I found David Baay's explanations and it worked. Pretty simple and works well.

Edited by Terry Kelley
Solution Found

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