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No 32 bit version for Win 7???

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4 hours ago, abacab said:

That appears to be a rather grand proclamation, but bottom line you offer no evidence, nor willingness to share the solution with the group.  Why even bother?

Apologies for apparently coming off as arrogant or secretive.

I "bothered" to let people know that it was possible, and suggested they check out how to do it via a common search technique.

I didn't think it would be responsible to post a link to a specific recipe as it involves doing things that are deliberately obscured by Microsoft because people can mess up their systems using Group Policy Editor. If you Google how to do it, you'll find a variety of techniques and may decide for yourself which one you feel comfortable with or even whether you want to fiddle with it at all.

I mean, if you think I'm lying or something, check it out:

Evidence!

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I used this method. No malware or PUPs, and now I have the Group Policy Editor on my Win 10 Home machine. Apparently, Microsoft doesn't approve of this and "deprecates" various policies from time to time, possibly including the exact one you'd like to use. But, it's cheaper than buying Win 10 Pro (it's free!), and it might work, and who cares what Microsoft thinks?

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Thank you, Mal and Larry. This is what I meant. I didn't want folks to think it was a matter of just flipping a switch.

You guys both researched it, one of you came to the conclusion that it wasn't even worth the hassle. 👍

Larry, that procedure looks like the one I followed, too. A lot of command line typing from an elevated prompt?

Some people will weigh the cost:benefit ratio and come to the conclusion that Larry and I did: why not enable this feature that gives me more control over my Windows 10 system? Some people will not want to bother or believe it to be a risk.

I'm a hobbyist with 3 computers that all run Cakewalk. If I hose one of them, no biggie. I unplug one of the Firepods and plug it into the notebook. But I know there are people on here who depend on their DAW systems for more than just personal enjoyment.

Who knows, Microsoft will probably disable our access to GPSEC in a future update anyway.

For now, my hard drives sure are a lot quieter without Windows Defender constantly sifting through everything on them to make sure my synth presets aren't infected with viruses. And I can still run Defender as an ad hoc scanner. Feels good to use my computer the way I like to.

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There is a setting in preferences but chances are you won't need to mess with it. The BitBridge server runs automatically when scanning 32bit plug-ins and when 32bit plug-ins are loaded into a project.

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Drag. Maybe "j" will take pity and give you a refund on the license? Or credit it toward https://jstuff.wordpress.com/cmah/?

Are there still new DAW's that don't come with 32-64-bit VST wrappers?

I got in the habit of avoiding 32-bit plug-ins unless absolutely necessary because Mixcraft's wrapper incurs a lot of overhead.

There are some, though, that are irreplaceable. Mostly in the VSTi category.

What was a bummer was that one of the most popular tool for small plug-in developers, Synthedit, would only build 32-bit plug-ins, so I would see some free or low-cost plug-in announced at KVR only to discover that the neato cassette tape harpsichord or whatever was built with Synthedit and therefore 32-bit.

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On 1/20/2019 at 2:27 AM, Larry Jones said:

I used this method. No malware or PUPs, and now I have the Group Policy Editor on my Win 10 Home machine. Apparently, Microsoft doesn't approve of this and "deprecates" various policies from time to time, possibly including the exact one you'd like to use. But, it's cheaper than buying Win 10 Pro (it's free!), and it might work, and who cares what Microsoft thinks?

Go legit... and there's no worries about broken Group Policy Editor.

At some point, your time and potential frustration is worth something.

  • If you're loading from scratch, the OEM version of Win10 Pro is an additional $40.
  • The in-place upgrade from Win10 Home to Pro is $100. 

 

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16 hours ago, Dave Horch said:

Well damn, I just wasted $17 on jbridge,

You may encounter 32Bit plugin/s that don't cope well with BitBridge.

Having jBridge as an alternative is worth the $17.

jBridge has numerous options to tweak... if you encounter a problematic 32Bit plugin.

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17 hours ago, Dave Horch said:

Well damn, I just wasted $17 on jbridge,

Not necessarily, there are some  32bit plug-ins that perform better in jBridge. That said, the faster one can retire 32bit plug-ins the better. Unsupported, not maintained, requiring an additional layer of software to work, 32bit plug-ins are not a good idea.

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3 hours ago, Jim Roseberry said:

Go legit... and there's no worries about broken Group Policy Editor.

At some point, your time and potential frustration is worth something.

  • If you're loading from scratch, the OEM version of Win10 Pro is an additional $40.
  • The in-place upgrade from Win10 Home to Pro is $100. 

 

If I remember correctly, I have paid around $40 (to MS directly, so absolute legit) for XP to Win8 upgrade. XP was pro, so I have Win 10 Pro. That is about the "inflation" in the Windows world 😉

Whatever I have tried with editor, I could not prevent Windows to contact MS. And I am not alone. Yes, I could disable these stupid "windows is restarted" thing, as well as crashing working system during drivers updates. But every time I see some unexpected disk activity, that is MS. That can be partially disabled in the services and scheduler, but many things are reverted after updates (or prevent updates running smoothly).

And for "go legit". Why someone need to pay money to get LESS service? That make no big sense for me.

For the topic. Well, I am prepared for whatever happens with Sonar Platinum+/Cakelab, 32bit, etc. I have a backup DAW which runs on all currently available platforms, has no online authorization nor dongles and can load CW projects with most plug-ins (including DX). The only worry is about DimPro, which has CCC authorization and is not "Bandlab". The rest can go to hell without troubles for me. But as long as it is working, why not enjoy the live 😁

PS. For mentioned thread with authorization... My conclusion is that Bandlab should work fine 6 month after update, for any "offline" work. Using it without Internet in the near, especially live, is "no go".  For that I have X3 and "another DAW".

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15 minutes ago, azslow3 said:

Whatever I have tried with editor, I could not prevent Windows to contact MS. And I am not alone. Yes, I could disable these stupid "windows is restarted" thing, as well as crashing working system during drivers updates. But every time I see some unexpected disk activity, that is MS. That can be partially disabled in the services and scheduler, but many things are reverted after updates (or prevent updates running smoothly).

 

Windows will continue to contact MS no matter what, unless you disconnect from the net.

It is built-in to report diagnostic and usage data telemetry to the mothership, but that is not the same thing as updates. You can stop those updates.

If it's disk activity that concerns you, as you mentioned, shutting down unnecessary services and scheduled tasks can reduce that.  Having the OS on SSD also helps reduce the impact of background tasks on system performance.

Edited by abacab

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13 hours ago, Jim Roseberry said:

Go legit... and there's no worries about broken Group Policy Editor.

At some point, your time and potential frustration is worth something.

  • If you're loading from scratch, the OEM version of Win10 Pro is an additional $40.
  • The in-place upgrade from Win10 Home to Pro is $100.  

 

Thanks, Jim. Did you happen to look at the details in the link I posted? I went from 8.1 to 10, and didn't know at the time that I had any option to upgrade to a higher version of Windows. My impression now is that gpedit.msc is included in Windows 10 Home but disabled so casual users wouldn't mess up their systems. I don't understand that, as how many casual users would accidentally invoke it in the first place? My guess would be none. In any case I probably will never get around to using it for anything, as I'm not having serious problems with unexpected updates and I work privately on my own stuff, so no angry clients to worry about. I enabled it mainly to see if I could.

Regarding "going legit," I have bought at least a dozen retail copies of Windows, so I feel like I am legit enough. 🙃

Edited by Larry Jones
clarification

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Josephine Blowsephine is happy editing video with Vaguest 7, which runs just fine on her system. Tragix offers her a free upgrade to Vaguest 10, telling her that it will run just as well on her system, but be more secure and have more features, and besides, they are ending support for Vaguest 7.

Josephine says what the heck and downloads the patch that will upgrade her system to Vaguest 10 and fires it up with some anticipation.

Only she finds that it doesn't run just as well on her system, it's incompatible with one of her video cards and weirdest of all, her housemate and kids start complaining that Netflix and Amazon Prime aren't streaming very well, although her flat has Gigabit fiber.

Josephine hits Google and finds out that Vaguest 10 has a feature where if it finds a fast enough Internet connection, it will go out and attempt to form a processing farm with other Vaguest 10 systems to share rendering duties. She also finds out that Vaguest Pro 10 has an extra admin control panel that allows the user to disable this feature, while plain Vaguest 10 does not.

She also finds a procedure that will allow her to enable the extra admin control panel on the plain Vaguest 10 edition.

She performs the procedure, enables the control panel and uses it to turn off the new, unwanted feature that is messing up her system and preventing her from getting full enjoyment and use from the software.

Should she feel "relieved," "3733t3," "legit," or "2legit2quit?"

Or is it better if she works on being less concerned with how she should feel and just feels?

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I do not think disabling updates can be perceived as a hack.

When I have installed Windows 8, 8.1 and then 10, I had to agree they are going to collect information and push updates by default. And I have not switching off anything.

With 8, 8.1 and at the beginning with 10 there was no problems. But at some point my system has started to reboot when I was about to work, and not some quick reboot since my computer is old. So at the middle of the day I had to wait an hour till it finish something. Also telemetry is taking longer and longer to collect, also it does not wait till the system is idle, it runs at its own wish, with 100% system consumption.

During the last year I had to connect to many friends remotely to fix "automagically installed" problems.

While I have agreed that MS does something on my system and what they do is "legit",  in practice that means I no longer can use my own computer when I want. Someone can say "your own fault". But I was born in the USSR: if someone fool you, fool him. I am sure most people here do not understand that, but the whole capitalistic world is based on fooling each other. USSR was an attempt to change that, but that attempt was unsuccessful  😀

 

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years ago i had a summer job helping run some go-karts... during the opening times the engines were throttled down to the legal requirement but when we closed we opened them up and burned round that track!

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Good heavens. When did computer users become such nervous nellies? I guess it was the onset of GUI's. This idea that "Microsoft didn't include a big colored button and a Help file to tell me how to do it so it must be a license violation or downright immoral." When I first got a computer, the only way to install things, even run them, even use them, was via a command shell just like the one I used to enable the Group Policy Editor that was already installed on my Windows 10 Home system.

Windows 10 Home comes with a feature, and I can turn the feature on or off if I want, even if Microsoft doesn't give me a nice Fisher-Price GUI to do so. There are certain features of Cakewalk that require editing of a raw text file to enable and configure. Having to enable or install features from a command shell happens all the time in other OSes such as Linux.

I know of nothing in my Windows 10 Home license that says I mustn't enable Group Policy Editor nor disable realtime Defender scanning. If anyone can cite language that states otherwise, I will stand corrected.

Besides, I think people should "walk on the wild side" every once in a while.

Back when upholstery had those tags that said "not to be removed under penalty of law," I used to just rip them right off and gleefully toss them in the trash. I got away with it, too. They never caught me. I don't know if there's a statute of limitations on that, and you know what, I don't care. Don't do the crime if you can't do the time, and I'm prepared to pull a stretch for the tag-rippin' I did in my youth. I had my fun.

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