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Dreamer

No 32 bit version for Win 7???

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I don't see many new versions of applications being released in 32-bit these days. 

It seems that many developers have decided to focus their development resources on the 64-bit model. 

You could acquire a 64-bit computer to try out newer software on.  Many 32-bit DAW applications and plugins will still run fine on 64-bit Windows, so you can install your trusted apps side by side with  the new versions and still continue to use the 32-bit DAW apps that you are comfortable with.  Then gradually migrate your workflow to the newer 64-bit apps when you are ready.

On the Windows 7 topic, I can understand the desire to retain older apps that still work, but Windows 7 will lose support next year.  Moving to a supported OS would be recommended at that point, unless you plan to be completely self supported. and intend to maintain a "legacy" computing environment.  But as mentioned earlier, the older apps should be fine on a modern 64-bit OS, at least for now. At some point, app developers will discontinue support for unsupported OS.

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I do have a legacy environment and I've always been self supported. (BTW, I do have both 32 and 64 bit windows 7, 8, 10). You're correct on that many of my favorite plugins are older. But contrary to what you stated, most are not supported in 64bit. So I'm SOL with this upgrade. My stuff works fine. Just that I cant jump on the bandwagon this time around. I'm an IT graduate and I know enough to say that windows 8 is the last of the non service oriented OS.  Windows 10 is an atrocious piece of garbage. If that's were things are moving to I'm OK with it.  It's happened before. Windows will back track and so will the software developers. 🙂

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8 hours ago, Dreamer said:

I do have a legacy environment and I've always been self supported. (BTW, I do have both 32 and 64 bit windows 7, 8, 10). You're correct on that many of my favorite plugins are older. But contrary to what you stated, most are not supported in 64bit.
 

Everything should run on a 64-bit Windows.  If you are referring to 32-bit plugins, your options are more limited, but you can still run a 32-bit DAW on 64-bit Windows.  I have Cakewalk Project 5 (32-bit only) running on a current release of Windows 10 64-bit. It runs my 32-bit plugins just fine.

And with Cakewalk by BandLab (64-bit), running here on 64-bit Windows I can still load 32-bit plugins, thanks to the built-in bit bridge in CbB.

Edited by abacab

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9 hours ago, Dreamer said:

I do have a legacy environment and I've always been self supported. (BTW, I do have both 32 and 64 bit windows 7, 8, 10). You're correct on that many of my favorite plugins are older. But contrary to what you stated, most are not supported in 64bit. So I'm SOL with this upgrade. My stuff works fine. Just that I cant jump on the bandwagon this time around. I'm an IT graduate and I know enough to say that windows 8 is the last of the non service oriented OS.  Windows 10 is an atrocious piece of garbage. If that's were things are moving to I'm OK with it.  It's happened before. Windows will back track and so will the software developers. 🙂

Apart from some legacy DirectX effects, I haven't found a 32 bit plugin that doesn't run in CbB. 

I do find that JBridge does a much better job than BitBridge though, especially as there's some options to tweak things when incompatibilities arise (mainly GUI issues).

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A 32Bit application can only address 4GB RAM.

If you're working with virtual-instruments, that's a tough limitation.

ie: Loading a full kit in Superior Drummer 3 takes about 2GB RAM. 

 

Development resources are finite.

In today's economic environment, it doesn't make sense for a company to spend resources on antiquated products.

BTW, CbB is not alone in this situation. 

  • Steinberg doesn't make a 32Bit version of Cubase 10
  • Line-6 only makes a 64Bit version of Helix Native
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I really don't understand the bullheaded resistance to Windows 10.  I get "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." I get not always having to jump on the latest update the minute it drops. I get that those who live on the cutting edge often end up bleeding to death. I get it.  But I really don't understand the bullheaded resistance to upgrading after four years.

 

But W7 is going away.  W7 is 10 years old.  Eventually your beloved antique  computer with it's beloved antique OS is going to die.  You, at some point WILL  upgrade.  Either because you choose to or because you are forced to.

W10 is not "an atrocious piece of garbage. " It is proven. Scads of people use it regularly and have no problems.

The thing about falling behind is that the further you fall behind, the further you fall behind.  You become ever more susceptible to attacks as vulnerabilities multiply and become easier and easier to exploit.  Your likelihood of things getting  corrupted increases. Hardware fails and it's  replacement isn't compatible. 

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27 minutes ago, Jim Roseberry said:

Development resources are finite.

In today's economic environment, it doesn't make sense for a company to spend resources on antiquated products.

BTW, CbB is not alone in this situation. 

  • Steinberg doesn't make a 32Bit version of Cubase 10
  • Line-6 only makes a 64Bit version of Helix Native

Also dropped 32-bit versions (64-bit only now):

PreSonus Studio One v4

Ableton Live v10

Tracktion Waveform v9

Propellerhead Reason v10

Avid Pro Tools 2018

Edited by abacab
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"Except by default, a 32-bit user mode process can only access 2GB."

It's a whopping 3GB with the Large Address Aware switch enabled.   😉

That takes us back a few years...  

 

 

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1 hour ago, Byron Dickens said:

 

 

But W7 is going away.  W7 is 10 years old.  Eventually your beloved antique  computer with it's beloved antique OS is going to die.  You, at some point WILL  upgrade.  Either because you choose to or because you are forced to.

Actually I may not have to, since I probably don't have that many years left of being able to use it,  as I'm closer to being a fall turkey than a spring chicken. 

1 hour ago, Byron Dickens said:

 

 

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2 hours ago, Byron Dickens said:

I really don't understand the bullheaded resistance to Windows 10.  I get "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." I get not always having to jump on the latest update the minute it drops. I get that those who live on the cutting edge often end up bleeding to death. I get it.  But I really don't understand the bullheaded resistance to upgrading after four years.

Windows 8.1 will most likely be my last version of Windows that I run. For me, it comes down to who does the computer belong to - me, or the company that makes the software the computer runs on. Microsoft (and many others) clearly believe that once you put their software on it, your computer and what you do with it belongs to them. The amount of 'telemetry' being sent back to the mother ship and the forced updates are my primary factors to moving away from Windows. In fact, the primary reason this computer still has Windows is due to Sonar/Cakewalk. I have switched over to Linux for just about everything else.

I should also note that when Windows first appeared, I was a very big proponent of the software and the company. But as is typical, as the company got bigger things changed and not necessarily for the better. As they changed, so did I.

So yes, my next computer will be upgraded, but not with Windows 10.

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I hear what you're saying about Win10 and what I refer to as the "annoying components"... but those things can be reined-in with the Pro version.

Once Cortana, OneDrive, all automatic updates including notifications, privacy settings, etc have been disabled... Win10 is a fine DAW platform.

FWIW, I feel like it's more of a "dumbing down" of the OS (trying to make it easy for the less tech-savvy) than a matter of control.  And in that, it's two-steps-forward... one-step-back.  On a computer, I rarely like anything "automatic".

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What I find funny is the bashing at Microsoft while the herd freely gives its information to Google, Amazon, Apple.

 

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The only real issue, and it is an issue, that I have with Windows 10 is that each major anniversary update breaks the licensing on a number of components on my DAW.  Waves plugins and Addictive Drums being the first two to come to mind.  The latest update, 1809 also broke my audio interface driver installation, requiring a full driver re-install.

With previous versions of Windows, you knew that if you upgraded, you were in for changes that you could prepare for in advance.  However, with Windows 10, major changes that used to be saved for version upgrades can be installed at any time, effectively breaking your DAW.  The October update just used up the last license renewal for Addictive Drums and I now need to raise a support call to get it working again.

This was not a problem in previous versions of Windows and is quite a significant down-side to being on Windows 10.

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9 minutes ago, Bill Ruys said:

The only real issue, and it is an issue, that I have with Windows 10 is that each major anniversary update breaks the licensing on a number of components on my DAW.  Waves plugins and Addictive Drums being the first two to come to mind.  The latest update, 1809 also broke my audio interface driver installation, requiring a full driver re-install.

With previous versions of Windows, you knew that if you upgraded, you were in for changes that you could prepare for in advance.  However, with Windows 10, major changes that used to be saved for version upgrades can be installed at any time, effectively breaking your DAW.  The October update just used up the last license renewal for Addictive Drums and I now need to raise a support call to get it working again.

This was not a problem in previous versions of Windows and is quite a significant down-side to being on Windows 10.

This I can relate to.  Last update screwed my network printer and I had to and reinstall drivers. Of course I find out from family while I'm at work and they desperately need to print something for school 😕

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Hi,

What I want to say is that I have been using cakewalk's software for more than 20 years, even longer. Every time to upgrade, I am grateful for it. I have been favoring it since the age of cakewalk 3.0. At that time, few people in China would use such software. Everyone is very strange to it, but curious, but also do not know how to use it.I have done some composing work before. Many people around the world, like me, may need 32-bit systems, mainly for the use of IC programming technology. I find that in this industry, many people still use 32 bits. A few years ago, the relevant cakewalk version 9.0, to progress, people's ideas also need to progress, but the old program has not been updated, still need the old 32 bits, is the need for work.

Software is not only used in compilation, all walks of life do not need it to use 32 bits, just for the need, this is the reason for 32 bits.

In addition, I also need 64 bits.  I can still work on 64 bits, high-performance computer systems for orchestration.

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33 minutes ago, Bill Ruys said:

The only real issue, and it is an issue, that I have with Windows 10 is that each major anniversary update breaks the licensing on a number of components on my DAW.  Waves plugins and Addictive Drums being the first two to come to mind.  The latest update, 1809 also broke my audio interface driver installation, requiring a full driver re-install.

With previous versions of Windows, you knew that if you upgraded, you were in for changes that you could prepare for in advance.  However, with Windows 10, major changes that used to be saved for version upgrades can be installed at any time, effectively breaking your DAW.  The October update just used up the last license renewal for Addictive Drums and I now need to raise a support call to get it working again.

This was not a problem in previous versions of Windows and is quite a significant down-side to being on Windows 10.

This distinction has been muddied by Microsoft in their attempt to call Windows 10 the "last Windows", while at the same time trying to push a rapid development cycle of two feature updates a year.

These feature updates (known as Anniversary Update, Creators Update, etc.) are actually full version updates, equivalent in some respects to the upgrades to Vista, Win7, Win8, Win10, etc.  If you pay attention, you will see a full version installer run each time you update one of these semi-annual versions.  They even change your computer ID, that some software activation relies upon, and that is what triggers the need to re-activate some items.

The only real way to get control of this annoyance, is to use Windows 10 Pro.  Using the Group Policy Editor in Pro, you can disable or defer the feature "upgrades" as long as you need to.  I always attempt to stay one version behind the current one. You will need to upgrade eventually, because MS keeps dropping support for older versions of Windows 10.  I think they maintain support for the most current 3 versions.

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