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Posted (edited)

"Blue Rondo ala Turk" - Dave Brubeck Quartet

When I was a kid we played at a Muscular Dystrophy telethon. We played right before the Dave Brubeck Quartet. Backstage after the gig, Paul Desmond the sax player was very kind and encouraging to this teenage sax player just cutting his gigging teeth. We played during the commercial break so we didn't get on TV (mom was disappointed) but we loved the experience anyway.

This tune for me is infectious. When it goes from 9/8 to 4/4 it makes the swing seem even more intense, and Paul's alto sax lines are just brilliant (the rest of the band excels too)

 

Edited by Notes_Norton
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Posted (edited)

Since Little Richard just died, I thought listening to his pre-rock 'n' roll blues album would be a nice tribute.

 

Edited by Notes_Norton
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Posted (edited)

This is an excellent album and played with such fluidity....a true master (CGP). 

 

 

 

Edited by Mesh
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Posted (edited)

I met Chet in the late 1980s or early 1990s. He said that he really wanted to be a jazz guitarist, but he knew which side of his bread the butter was on.

I think many career musicians find that the genre of music we are successful at chooses us. In retrospect, it's probably the right one for us too.

Chet was "one with the guitar", a very talented player in any genre he tried.

Here is Jon Hendrick's  take on a Neil Hefti/Count Basie song.

Lil' Darlin - Jon Hendricks and Company

 

 

Edited by Notes_Norton
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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, pwalpwal said:

like anti-prog 🤣

I'm in favour of that. :D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

... waits for the backlash from tiresome proggers.

Edited by Wibbles

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28 minutes ago, Wibbles said:

I'm in favour of that. :D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

... waits for the backlash from tiresome proggers.

tenor.gif

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5 hours ago, Mesh said:

tenor.gif

And yet they manage to find time for a 15 minute keyboard solo.

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Genius or insanity or both. Who needs a guitar when an electric rake will do instead?

 

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IMHO Kenny Burrell is a very nice guitar player. I found him indirectly through Stanley Turrentine (sax) and Jimmy Smith (organ) many years ago. I liked his improv ideas, his tone, and his comping.

Midnight Blue (full album) - Kenny Burrell

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

If there ever was a heavy metal symphony this is it. Prokofiev himself described it as 'iron and steel.'

It's not subtle, it attacks and affronts the listener, the dissonances are grating, and it's the closed 'classical' thing I know of to heavy metal. It was interesting at first and the more I listened to it, the more I liked it.

Symphony #2 in D minor -  Sergey Prokofiev - Neeme Jarvi conducting the Royal Scottish Orchestra

 

Edited by Notes_Norton
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Wes Montgomery -Airegin

Wes Montgomery was known for an unusual technique of plucking the strings with the side of his thumb and his extensive use of octaves, which gave him a distinctive sound.

 

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Posted (edited)

I read that Wes started playing that way so he wouldn't wake his wife while practicing. When he became successful, he tried to change his picking style to a pick or fingerpicking, but taking so many steps back to learn a new technique made that prohibitive - I certainly understand that. Wes was a great guitarist.

Prokofiev made that "iron and steel" symphony (#2) in my last post, but he was quite versatile. His symphony #2 was as different as night to day. I generally don't care for Ormandy's conducting of Romantic or Modern 'classical' works, but I think he does this one justice, probably because Prokofiev wrote what he though Hayden would write in the 20th century.


Symphony #1 - Sergey Prokofiev - Eugene Ormandy conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra

I couldn't get it to embed :(

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9A23QstVCIM

Edited by Notes_Norton
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Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, Notes_Norton said:

Prokofiev made that "iron and steel" symphony (#2) in my last post, but he was quite versatile. His symphony #2 was as different as night to day. I generally don't care for Ormandy's conducting of Romantic or Modern 'classical' works, but I think he does this one justice, probably because Prokofiev wrote what he though Hayden would write in the 20th century.

 

@ Notes,

thank you for the good hinds towards  classic music.

Have to admit that I don´t feel "at home" in classical music, but the Prokofiev Symphony´s (specially the Nr.1)

are a good chance to go deeper listening this kind of music-

which is , forgive me if it sounds harsh, effortful to listen for an  old rock fart 😀 like me.

It takes a lot of time,patience and concentration to get rid of my listening habits.

I hope you are doing well

Pete

P.S.

What I like most about Wes Montgomery guitar playing is his tone-

I ´ve never listened to a more  direct guitar tone.

It´s  a wonder  that he starts playing guitar very late(at 19 years).

 

 

 

Edited by Pragi

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Posted (edited)

A new song from a friend :

Marquette ( Markus Roth) - Into the wild

 

Edited by Pragi
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Posted (edited)

Pragi, you, Wibbles, Craig and others have all introduced me to songs and artists I never would have heard before. I'm really enjoying that. I've even gone and purchased some and added it to my digital Walkman.

I've played rock/pop for a living all my life. I played classical in school and jazz in the extra-curricular jazz band after school. Rock on the weekends for money and chicks. My mom liked Broadway and my dad was really fond of Big Band Jazz and pre-Nashville era country (Eddie Arnold, Jim Reeves, etc.). After high school I got in a road band and the other musicians introduced me to blues (Bobby Bland, Robert Johnson, etc.) and I used to go to record/CD stores and pick out things from racks I was not familiar with like Klezmer. When I took a job on a cruise ship for 3 years I learned about Salsa, Ska, Soca and Reggae from the musicians who play those forms of music.

There is so much out there I can't be confined to one type. I like playing different styles too, but to make a living, I play what the public wants to hear - and I like that as well.

I prefer Classical from Beethoven to the present, but not all of it, mostly the dark, brooding, exciting kind. What I like about it is on the thousandth listening I can still hear a variation of a motif or a combination of one or more others that I never heard before. I can't memorize every instrument part from start to finish like I can on more pop/rock/country/blues tracks.  On the other hand, my digital-walkman still has Muddy Waters, Zeppelin, Elvis, Andrews Sisters, Lyle Lovett, and the top 40 songs I grew up with on it.

Here is one from my youth. Vanilla Fudge doing a take on an even older Motown song. Hearing this again is like visiting an old friend

You Keep Me Hanging On - Vanilla Fudge

 

 

Edited by Notes_Norton
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