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Before.

EdIt I was thinking EQ not the compressor. So I think EQ first than compress. Sorry.  

Think this EQ is there to control tonal balance. That should be first. The compressor is there to control dynamics . That should be on the output and last. 

However, it really depends on what you want out of those two plugins. They can interact in interesting ways. Or you can use a dynamic EQ. Really we are at a point where you can do just about anything. It is all about the sound. 

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A compressor may introduce results, that make you need to EQ, and an EQ may cause a need to compress. So, depending on the material, it can be useful to have more than one of one or both.  I would start with an EQ, though.

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I agree with both reply's above.

I almost always  put the compressor first in the chain (Compressor>EQ). Because if you use it after, your compressing frequency's you might not want to compress. There are times though, boosting certain frequency's can add a great effect.

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One use of EQ before compression is to use a high-pass filter (to roll out unwanted low frequencies).

Doing this prior to compression can ensure the compressor doesn't respond to those (unwanted) low-end frequencies.

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3 minutes ago, Jim Roseberry said:

One use of EQ before compression is to use a high-pass filter (to roll out unwanted low frequencies).

Doing this prior to compression can ensure the compressor doesn't respond to those (unwanted) low-end frequencies.

One of the most common uses of EQ. Good point Jim. 

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22 minutes ago, Jim Roseberry said:

One use of EQ before compression is to use a high-pass filter (to roll out unwanted low frequencies).

i do this by default on almost every track...

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5 minutes ago, pwalpwal said:

i do this by default on almost every track...

It's one simple thing that can make a HUGE difference in the clarity of your mixes.

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1 hour ago, Jim Roseberry said:

One use of EQ before compression is to use a high-pass filter (to roll out unwanted low frequencies).

Doing this prior to compression can ensure the compressor doesn't respond to those (unwanted) low-end frequencies.

This also prevents your guitar Or Vocal compressor from triggering with the bass or kick.

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3 hours ago, John said:

However, it really depends on what you want out of those two plugins.

This is probably the most important thing said. As you can tell by all the different responses you got.

Use your ears!

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I mean, there's no right answer to this kind of question. Both have their advantages or disadvantages, plus it'll be relative to which compressors or EQs you're using. As mentioned, shaping the bass before you hit the compressor is going to have a big impact on how the compressor reacts to the input, but maybe you want to tailor how the EQ sounds after the compressor too. Depends on the material and what you're going for. 

Most important thing is to train your ears. If you understand how your tools work, then you'll be better able to apply them as you see fit. Experiment, listen, learn how things play together, then adjust as needed!

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The answer can be both, honestly. Also, it is common to apply eq only to the side chain input for the compressor. You can use this to avoid triggering on bass sounds without removing bass or to turn your compressor into a de-esser.

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Hah! Either is fine. You can get an opposite, equally firm opinion from industry pros on both approaches.

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FX do not care what they take in nor what they pass on, so always be mindful of the signal you are sending from one FX to the next. A compressed signal is harder to EQ if it has unwanted content (like roll-off's mentioned above), and there is nothing limiting you from multiple steps (where more transparent changes can be made). Mild compression in -> EQ the proper content (for the instrument) -> compressing again to fit the mix is not uncommon.

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7 minutes ago, mettelus said:

Mild compression in -> EQ the proper content (for the instrument) -> compressing again to fit the mix is not uncommon.

This^^^^

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