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Tubeydude

Asio4all driver

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Hi all,

I have a friend that is trying to use an interface (behringer UMC-22) on his laptop.  He is running a newish HP laptop with win 8.1 that is up to date.  He has downloaded and installed the ASIO4all driver.  This is the driver that you down load from the behringer support page.  It appears to install and and finish after going through the install wizard.  However, once in CbB there is no option to select the asio4all driver in preferences. 

The output of the mains from within CbB is the hp onboard speakers.  There is no option to set it to the UMC 22 or ASIO4all.

We tried going to control panel/hardware and sound/audio and setting the default audio setup to the UMC/ASIO4all.  That seemed to work as far as the computer was concerned.  However, when in CbB the option to select that is still not showing up.

Is there some known issue with installing ASIO4all?  Maybe there are better drivers for the UMC-22?

Thanks!

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Yup, did that.  However, even though the ASIO type was selected, just as you show, the option was not there in either audio/devices about that menu.  Really odd. 

 

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Check that there is only one ASIO driver installed on that machine.

I ran into interface configuration problems with Cakewalk a while back until I discovered that a Steinberg trial had slipped their generic ASIO driver onto my machine.

So then I was then unable to select an option in Cakewalk audio devices until I uninstalled the extra ASIO driver. I already had a working ASIO driver for my audio interface installed. Then I found the culprit in Windows add/remove programs, uninstalled it, and all was good again!

That may not be your problem, but it is one possibility.

 

Edited by abacab
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I will suggest he look for that.  I don't think he's ever installed another interface, but it is worth checking for sure. 

Now that you mention it, I seem to remember that there was another version of asio4all he mentioned. 

Thanks!

Edited by Tubeydude

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I would recommend not using ASIO4all as it is reality not an ASIO driver but a wrapper around a WMD driver.  Better to try using the WASAPI I get good results with it and a Realtek on board sound card when I can not be asked to fire up my studio.  I though Behringer had issues a proper drivers for their interfaces.

 

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Downloading the driver from the behringer support page for the device gets you the ASIO4all installer in your downloaded files folder.  Maybe there is another driver?

Is there a wasapi driver for the UMC?  I didn't think to have him look for that option.

Thanks

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WASAPI is already included in Windows. Just select it in the driver mode dialogue in Cakewalk under playback and recording preferences.

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This is probably the most puzzling thing about that Behringer interface :o

https://www.sweetwater.com/sweetcare/articles/behringer-audio-interface-setup-guide/

"Do I need to use the ASIO4All driver?

Although most Behringer audio interfaces have their own driver (version 4.38 as of July 2018), some of the smaller interfaces will require the third-party driver, ASIO4All. These interfaces include the UMC22, UM2, UCA222, and UCA202. Check out our ASIO4All setup guide for instructions on how to install and configure it."

Behringer product page with driver download link: https://www.behringer.com/Categories/Behringer/Computer-Audio/Interfaces/UMC22/p/P0AUX#googtrans(en|en)

Edited by abacab

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Behringer produce cheap interfaces. And even cheaper then cheap interfaces. UMC-22 is from the last category (f.e. UMC-202HD is from the first).

Cheapest interfaces have no ASIO drivers. Other have ASIO driver (logical).

ASIO4ALL is a kind of obsolete way. It sometimes was able to produce better results then pure WDM, but that was before Windows 8/10. Note that ASIO4ALL should be configured first, at least the device it should work with has not be selected (otherwise it can take internal audio, all interface together, etc.). But better simply uninstall it...

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It seems sketchy that a manufacturer would rely on ASIO4ALL as the sole driver for some of their interfaces, regardless of how cheap they are. No thanks!

I personally have nothing against ASIO4ALL, as it is running very well with low latency on my laptop with only a Realtek integrated audio chip. But that laptop is just a toy for playback when I travel, and don't use it for recording. I use a real audio interface with a real ASIO driver on my desktop DAW.

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Since Behringer does not supply a driver, the device must be class compliant or ASIO4All would not work. So the interface uses a driver supplied by Windows. This is not the first manufacturer to supply ASIO4All instead of a proper ASIO driver. The best thing the owner of this device could do is try to return the product to the seller and purchase an interface more suited for DAW use - a device with a manufacturer supplied ASIO driver.

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That sounds like potential trouble down the road. I think I like the refund suggestion the best!:D

 

Edited by abacab

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ASIO is just a protocol. It is simple and so it can be made effective without big effort. Recently MS has improved other APIs. After reading observations that some interfaces work more stable and with lower latency using other methods, I have checked myself with interfaces I have. Surprise, my "archaic" M-Audio Firewire in fact deliver not worse latency with other APIs (while in this particular case not better).

So ASIO is no longer "a must", for entry level devices ASIO4ALL is recommended just as a compatibility solutions, in case software has troubles using other APIs effectively.

BTW recent Realtek chips have own ASIO drivers. The performance and latency are reasonable (let say not worse then for cheap dedicated interfaces). Those chips which do not have it work with WASAPI not worse then ASIO4ALL. And so even in that case it is not required.

 

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I like some of the Behringer products.  But products include other things beside hardware such as packaging, included accessories, technical support, web archives and support software.

If I see packaging with bad grammar or misspelled words I'm leery.

If I contact technical support by telephone and we can't understand each other, or by email and there is no response, I'm leery.

If I can't find product documentation online I'm leery.

Finally, if a manufacturer does not state their device is class compliant but does not provide the device driver I'm leery.

There is nothing wrong with inexpensive or cheap but it likely is not the best way forward if you're thinking of purchasing a product for long term use and being cheap excludes consumer support.

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On 6/30/2019 at 1:50 AM, LadyFuzztail said:

Yeah, I am not touching Behringer after hearing about this.

I have one of the low end Behringer interfaces which uses Asio4all, and I have to say I've had no issues with it.  Latency is extremely low even with a relatively humble CPU and the sound quality is good.

Yes, I know a interface with a dedicated ASIO driver would have been better, but it was what I could afford at the time and I've had exceptional value from it.

That said, am I reading this correctly in that the Windows 10 WASAPI drivers also offer low-latency recording as well?  As if it does, I may well have to give that a try and see how it stacks up.

Edited by kevmsmith81

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I think that WASAPI performs relatively well. It's already installed with Windows, so all you have to do is click that driver mode in your DAW audio  preferences to give it a try.

And unlike ASIO, it is multi-client, so you can run multiple audio apps such as secondary DAWs and standalone synths etc.

I often use it if I want to run a secondary audio app alongside my main DAW. I just pick WASAPI on the second app, so that my DAW can continue to use ASIO.

 

Edited by abacab

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