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razor7music

[SOLVED] Guitar Pickup Question

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Hello

One of the posts, or poles on one of my Seymour Duncan pickups is really low down, almost below the pickup housing.

Is there a way to raise an individual post/pole?

Thanks

Edited by razor7music

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It's the B string position. (Guitar really needs a good cleaning!)

PXL_20210127_042423357~2.jpg

Edited by razor7music

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https://hazeguitars.com/blog/how-to-set-pickup-pole-piece-height

"Some instruments only have the non-adjustable slug-type poles (and you definitely should not try to adjust those)"

"I didn't make absolutely clear that you should not try to adjust any pickup poles that do not have a screw-slot or hex-head slot.

Many of the Fender-style single coil pickups are non-adjustable pickups can be damaged if you try to adjust them. Don't be tempted to push any of the slug-type poles (the ones with no screw-slots/hex-head). 

I have added a parenthetical in the text above and I'm adding this warning here. Only adjust screw or hex-head pickup poles. The ones that are meant to be adjustable. "

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It would be very hard to raise it.

You need to make an extension. A rod of metal the same diameter as the existing one. It can't be copper or aluminium. they are not magnetic. The bit can't be glued directly to the existing bit beause the magnetic flow would suffer, it has to be fixated to the housing. It's important to have the contact point between the two pieces absolutely flat and tight for best magnetic flow.

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18 hours ago, razor7music said:

Hello

One of the posts, or poles on one of my Seymour Duncan pickups is really low down, almost below the pickup housing.

Is there a way to raise an individual post/pole?

Thanks

Does it affect the volume balance between strings? If yes, then either try @Kurre's suggestion, or take it to a music instrument shop.

If the volume balance is correct, leave it.

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Guitar B strings are typically under much more tension than the other strings, making it's output higher than the others. Reducing the distance between the B string and it's pole piece is a way to help equalize its volumes to match the other strings. Since Seymour doesn't know what gauge you use, he had to find a compromise that works "well enough" for the most common gauges. If you want more detail, send in a question to their support line and ask them what string gauge your pickup were designed for. In the meantime, I'd just leave it alone. It is not a defect.

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I've always had problems with the high G pole, so I go for the so called "modern stagger", which lowers that. The high E and B are about the same, (slightly lower B), the G is lower than the D and the low E and A poles are about the same, (about the same as the lowered G).

On your pickups, they look more like the "vintage stagger". These have a the higher G, and a more recessed B. In the end it's about the sound, if you don't mind the sound then  there is no problem, if you don't like the sound then there is a problem, regardless of what the poles look like. While it is physically possible to lower or raise the poles, it carries a risk that you might ruin the pickup. If you don't like the sound then you might look at getting some different pickups with the modern stagger, those being Seymour Duncan will probably have good resale value.

I thought this guy explains the situation quite well:

 

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