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kevmsmith81

Audio dropouts making Cakewalk unusable.

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On 27/2/2020 at 11:22, kevmsmith81 said:

¿Alguien más tiene este problema con la última actualización? Es el código de error 4

Los abandonos de audio están llegando al punto en que ya no puedo usar este DAW. Solo para intentar lo menos exigente que se me ocurrió, intenté hacer una sola toma vocal en una pista de acompañamiento de karaoke, y todavía lo entiendo.

He intentado cambiar de los controladores personalizados de mi interfaz a Asio4all, y aún sucede.

Como referencia, puedo tener exactamente las mismas cosas abiertas en Reaper, con los mismos complementos que usan la misma configuración del controlador y no obtengo abandonos en eso, así que estoy seguro de que no es mi computadora el problema, sino Cakewalk.

Prefiero usar Cakewalk, ya que tengo más confianza en mi camino, pero si esto no se detiene, ¡tendré que comenzar a aprender Reaper correctamente!

 

EDITAR: Solo como referencia, mi máquina es una computadora portátil con Windows 10 con una CPU Ryzen 5 2500U y 16 GB de RAM, por lo que es un sistema bastante decente. Tiene un HDD mecánico en lugar de un SSD, pero aun así Cakewalk estaba bien antes de las últimas actualizaciones.

Activando la memoria cache de lectuara se me soluciono a mi yo la puse a 1024

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Th

On 3/3/2020 at 12:24 AM, Will_Kaydo said:

A few clutter sitting some where in the 64bit version of the DAW maybe. I don't know.

 

This make sense in many ways.

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On 3/2/2020 at 1:21 AM, Will_Kaydo said:

 Could it be that there's too much clutter some where on it's engine in the workspace? Some sort of outdated file source? This only started happening with the 64bit version on my side.  I don't recall dealing with this in the 32it version. 

 

I'm 100% onboard what you have said here. 

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On 2/27/2020 at 9:51 PM, Max Arwood said:

I wish we could have an "official" statement of tweaks. I wish it would have  a few levels - These will help, These will help more, and - If you are desperate for horsepower try these.

Well, there is a page in the official Cakewalk documentation about improving audio performance, but I'm not even going to link to it here. It's so out of date that I started a lighthearted humorous thread about it called "Wisdom of the Ages." It looks as if it has not been updated in decades. There are men and women reading this thread, using CbB, who were literally not yet born when that document was last touched. I would like to compile a Windows 10-appropriate list that the new devs could incorporate into the current documentation if they wish, but that's another thread.

Anyway, when I first upgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 10 (I'll now call it an "upgrade"), my system was not 100% happy. So I rolled up my sleeves and looked at what was going on using some analysis tools. I learned two important things.

First, Cakewalk's playback engine streams from every clip's associated audio file every time you hit Play*. That goes for muted clips and tracks, too. The only tracks and clips that don't stream are ones that are Archived.

(*Not all DAW's do this. Some have logic that figures out which is the audio that needs to be streamed (that is, clips that are unmuted) and streams only those files, and some may even do dirty tricks like compress or bandwidth limit on playback (on PLAYBACK, I stress, not mixdown) in order to provide that coveted glitch-free mixing experience. With so many people believing that "all DAW's sound the same," they can do whatever they want, because, after all, it's impossible for a DAW to sound different. 😎)

Second, Windows Defender Antimalware Service is set up by default to scan everything in real time. That is, every time a program reads or writes a file to or from the drive, Defender is sitting there waiting to jump in and scan it. That includes VST plug-ins, samples, audio files and all the dynamic linking libraries that any Windows program like Cakewalk loads during runtime. Just think of a whole extra program between Cakewalk and the drive that's scanning your vocal performance for malware on the fly....

This is not theoretical. In both cases I sat here and watched Windows Process Monitor as I ran a project and did a Keanu "whoa." In @Robert Bone's worst suspicions I doubt there's a wi-fi adapter driver around that could eat up as much overhead as I was seeing, and I was getting clean DPC scans. 😀

But enough of my prattle!

What can we do about this?

Windows Defender allows you to exclude certain folders from realtime scanning. Get thee now to Settings/Security and exclude your Cakewalk project folders from realtime scanning. I also recommend you do it for your plug-in and sample folders. None of these folders are likely to carry a malware payload, and if by some chance they did, Defender would pick it up on its systemwide scans. Be aware that Microsoft loves to revert your security settings, so once you've excluded folders from realtime scanning, check that setting every couple of months to make sure that they haven't switched back.

Also, in projects with many unused takes that you're keeping around for possible later comping or alternate versions, etc., consider moving them to other tracks and then Archiving those tracks so that they don't all get streamed unnecessarily while you're mixing and comping your main "keepers."

Try these and report back if you see an improvement in performance. They work for me, on my system, but as always, YMMV.

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I have used Avira for years now and have excluded the folders you mention. Without the exclusions, even a fast system can be brought to its knees.

Timbo

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11 hours ago, Starship Krupa said:

Well, there is a page in the official Cakewalk documentation about improving audio performance, but I'm not even going to link to it here. It's so out of date that I started a lighthearted humorous thread about it called "Wisdom of the Ages." It looks as if it has not been updated in decades. There are men and women reading this thread, using CbB, who were literally not yet born when that document was last touched. I would like to compile a Windows 10-appropriate list that the new devs could incorporate into the current documentation if they wish, but that's another thread.

Anyway, when I first upgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 10 (I'll now call it an "upgrade"), my system was not 100% happy. So I rolled up my sleeves and looked at what was going on using some analysis tools. I learned two important things.

First, Cakewalk's playback engine streams from every clip's associated audio file every time you hit Play*. That goes for muted clips and tracks, too. The only tracks and clips that don't stream are ones that are Archived.

(*Not all DAW's do this. Some have logic that figures out which is the audio that needs to be streamed (that is, clips that are unmuted) and streams only those files, and some may even do dirty tricks like compress or bandwidth limit on playback (on PLAYBACK, I stress, not mixdown) in order to provide that coveted glitch-free mixing experience. With so many people believing that "all DAW's sound the same," they can do whatever they want, because, after all, it's impossible for a DAW to sound different. 😎)

Second, Windows Defender Antimalware Service is set up by default to scan everything in real time. That is, every time a program reads or writes a file to or from the drive, Defender is sitting there waiting to jump in and scan it. That includes VST plug-ins, samples, audio files and all the dynamic linking libraries that any Windows program like Cakewalk loads during runtime. Just think of a whole extra program between Cakewalk and the drive that's scanning your vocal performance for malware on the fly....

This is not theoretical. In both cases I sat here and watched Windows Process Monitor as I ran a project and did a Keanu "whoa." In @Robert Bone's worst suspicions I doubt there's a wi-fi adapter driver around that could eat up as much overhead as I was seeing, and I was getting clean DPC scans. 😀

But enough of my prattle!

What can we do about this?

Windows Defender allows you to exclude certain folders from realtime scanning. Get thee now to Settings/Security and exclude your Cakewalk project folders from realtime scanning. I also recommend you do it for your plug-in and sample folders. None of these folders are likely to carry a malware payload, and if by some chance they did, Defender would pick it up on its systemwide scans. Be aware that Microsoft loves to revert your security settings, so once you've excluded folders from realtime scanning, check that setting every couple of months to make sure that they haven't switched back.

Also, in projects with many unused takes that you're keeping around for possible later comping or alternate versions, etc., consider moving them to other tracks and then Archiving those tracks so that they don't all get streamed unnecessarily while you're mixing and comping your main "keepers."

Try these and report back if you see an improvement in performance. They work for me, on my system, but as always, YMMV.

I use Windows Defender, and I wasn't aware of this.

So, I will try this and see how I get on.  And thank you!

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 Buenas una preguntilla ¿

Cuando activar la memoria cache 

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