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80 TB Hard Drives are coming!

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The first computer I ever bought used floppies that held 144 megs.  You bought them in packs of 10 and I remember thinking I would never fill them all.  And now 80TB?  The crazy part is I KNOW I'd fill it up.

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17 minutes ago, jude77 said:

The first computer I ever bought used floppies that held 144 megs.  You bought them in packs of 10 and I remember thinking I would never fill them all.  And now 80TB?  The crazy part is I KNOW I'd fill it up.

Ditto...first work PC was 8088...running DOS.  The upgrade to windows was a GODSEND,
because there was a lot of work I needed to copy across programs, and Windows made it 
a BREEZE !!!

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The IBM XT.  If I remember correctly it had 256 Mb of Ram and a 20 Mb Hard drive,
and a 5 and a quarter Floppy...and THAT
was "State of the Art" at the time!  Getting a 3.5 Floppy was a HUGE upgrade LOL!!!

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Finally I can own every plugin known to man.

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I worked at the Hewlett-Packard Enterprise division many years and gigabit drives were a major break through back at the end of the last century!

Anybody remember "getting perpendicular" with Hatachi ???

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xb_PyKuI7II

Take care,

h

 

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53 minutes ago, jude77 said:

The first computer I ever bought used floppies that held 1.44 megs. 

fixed

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They gotta make these since the emergence of the SSD market.   These would be great for archiving.   I'm sure I could come close to filling half of these.  PC games are reaching 100GB.  Plus those bloated sample libraries, loops, and don't forget those gluttonous Windows OS backups.

The only problem with these is if a platter goes bad might as well ditch the whole thing.

I still have more confidence in the longevity of a HDD over a SSD.  

 

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When I composed  music in the 80s with  Voyetra's Sequencer Plus, I plugged in my 5.25" floppy (360K) and loaded up the software into RAM.  Then I took it out and put in another 360K floppy to save my data.   Of course Sequencer Plus was MIDI only.  All sound came from my synths and modules and effects came from hardware.  

But apparently, it still works today! 

I remember when I got my first computer with a 20 Mb hard drive.  Wow!  As my programs were kilobytes in size, and could be loaded in RAM, I didn't know what I could possibly do with all that data!  

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18 minutes ago, kitekrazy said:

I still have more confidence in the longevity of a HDD over a SSD.

Me too. In my experience SSD's silently lose files more frequently and don't like hard resets (including power outages). Out of all the storage media I've used one stands out as the most consistently unreliable, and that is SD cards. I'd never store anything of value on them longer than is absolutely necessary before backing them up on a hard disk.

HDD's fail too, but usually it's gradual and you get some warning signs such as occasional read/write errors and then "bad sectors" where those become chronic. If the HDD "blows up" and suddenly and instantly becomes unusable, it may just be the driving circuit board which can be repaired or replaced. If the fault is in the mechanical parts you probably need the services of a specialized lab.

I would never use a 80TB HDD with its insanely fine machinery and bit-density as a final storage for any precious data. I would buy tape for that. Or carve the ones and zeros onto a block of marble or granite with a hammer & chisel.

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23 minutes ago, Reid Rosefelt said:

When I composed  music in the 80s with  Voyetra's Sequencer Plus, I plugged in my 5.25" floppy (360K) and loaded up the software into RAM.  Then I took it out and put in another 360K floppy to save my data.   Of course Sequencer Plus was MIDI only.  All sound came from my synths and modules and effects came from hardware.  

But apparently, it still works today! 

I remember when I got my first computer with a 20 Mb hard drive.  Wow!  As my programs were kilobytes in size, and could be loaded in RAM, I didn't know what I could possibly do with all that data!  

Voyetra DOP was my first DAW.  Too bad they got out of the DAW business.   

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When I started computing, we had to load our data into leaky baskets made of mastodon leather tanned with urine and haul it up the side of a glacier in the middle of snowstorms in July.

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Well, my FIRST computer experience was with "Punch Cards" in High School.
We played "Oregon Trail" a LOT...LOL

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Now they need to work on physical hard drive speed. I saw at CES that one of the companies, Seagate I think. is working on a multi-actuator drive that they claim will work the same speeds as an SSD but I'm not holding my breath on the reality of that happening. Plus, it's Seagate so it will last a week before failing. :P

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16 hours ago, Reid Rosefelt said:

When I composed  music in the 80s with  Voyetra's Sequencer Plus, I plugged in my 5.25" floppy (360K) and loaded up the software into RAM.  Then I took it out and put in another 360K floppy to save my data.   Of course Sequencer Plus was MIDI only.  All sound came from my synths and modules and effects came from hardware.  

But apparently, it still works today! 

I remember when I got my first computer with a 20 Mb hard drive.  Wow!  As my programs were kilobytes in size, and could be loaded in RAM, I didn't know what I could possibly do with all that data!  

I still do this TODAY with my  Ensoniq Mirage, which I love and use a lot - it has a pretty unique sound

Nigel

 

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17 hours ago, slartabartfast said:

When I started computing, we had to load our data into leaky baskets made of mastodon leather tanned with urine and haul it up the side of a glacier in the middle of snowstorms in July.

Yes,  but we were happy

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