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Tim Smith

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  1. I am pretty much genreless, so I have a mish mash of recordings I've done. For awhile I was a church pianist vocalist and maybe 5 years later one individual who knows someone I know asks for me or wonders if I'm coming back. I have had several tell me they liked what I did. The worst comment came from a little old lady who told me I was hitting the keys too hard. I constantly run into people in grocery stores and elsewhere who stop to chat with me and I have no idea who they are. I guess after 10 years of that playing to larger groups I can't remember everyone. Lately I've been playing guitar. I admit I am a hack on it, but I seem to get by pretty well faking everyone out that I can actually play the thing. I squeak by on some of those chords playing whatever version of the chord I think I can pull off and not be noticed that it was a lot harder to do than I wanted it to look. Playing fingerstyle and then strumming means I'm mostly without a pick. I'll be up playing it soon on and off. I guess we'll see how that all turns out. I never really looked at myself as playing anything particularly well, but if I can make it look like I'm playing they won't know any better.
  2. It seems some musicians just like to play music and to heck with the tech. I have a friend who tours a good bit and even he doesn't seem to have a very strong connection with music tech, even though he plays regularly to backing tracks. He plugs in, makes a few adjustments and plays (guitar). A very layed back gentle guy. I think I must be somewhere in between. I mean, I like tech if I feel comfortable with it. If I don't it adds to uncertainty. It seems to be different in a studio environment because then it's like my little sandbox to play endlessly with music tech. I don't mind that. It's more when I need to utilize it for playing live. If something doesn't work or goes wrong it could seriously shake up what I'm doing. I don't do it very often and maybe that's part of the problem. I don't have a system down that I feel ok with. The last few days I have tried different hardware setups and checking my wireless setup to make sure I can be ok with it. That was when I found the 1/4" plug into my guitar wasn't always making contact. IF I pulled the plug out very slightly it works, so that's an issue I need to fix. Backing tracks are another thing. I pulled out my old RC-300 looper that can hold 3 hours of .wav audio. It has rhythms but they are cheesy and no change ups. It's like a drummer stuck in one loop all the time. Then I realized I could dump tracks from my computer into it but I need a roland driver. I had almost forgotten the days when you needed to download a driver for everything. New OS recognizes a lot more than it once did. Apparently not this. The RC-300 has a lot of little details that need to be ironed out or you'll be playing a song repeated not wanting to and other similar stuff. I have realized how much I dislike menus and submenus. If I knew exactly what I was doing it would be far easier. Keyboards that once sounded pretty good now sound terrible compared to my software synths. After two days messing with various keyboards and stuff, I guess I'm back to square one which is either a DAW for tracks or I'll just plug in and play acoustic. I don't have a comfortable feeling yet with backing tracks, even if I make them. I can't say exactly why. It seems writing command strings into a midi controller is the easiest thing ever for some people. I mean it's hexidecimal, has 16 channels and values range from 1 to 128. For me it would be a challenge to get all of the program changes exactly right times with the songs. I prefer straight up easy to use guitar effects and that's probably why I use the stuff I do. So really it's like I'm of two different mindsets depending on whether I am messing about in my studio or if I'm playing out. Some of that probably has to do with no worry if I make a mistake in the studio. Everything can be edited and changed or even deleted there. Playing live is, well, full of unpredictable things and the more gear I add to it, the more chance for problems there are. Could just be me not accustomed to that envronment as much.
  3. Practicing alternate propulsion systems in Texas.
  4. So far it has done the job for me. Do you play that banjo in the pic?
  5. I second that and why I normally just upgrade to standard which is everything but the extra vsti and libs which amounts to orchestral stuff and some other things I didn't need. Quite a bit comes with the suite package. My upgrade before the end of Feb from 11 to 12 is $127.00.
  6. I think going without Alexa is the safer way to go. I guess I am unsafe. I just tell her what I want to turn on or off. I have a fan for white noise that I could schedule to just turn on through Alexa, but I verbally tell her to turn it on. Most of the house is verbal commands. Even my cooling system. Alexa is an app too, so if I'm in another country I can look at my blink cameras or command things I want to turn on or off. If I loose wifi in that other country though I obviously loose that control. I had the blink set up in my great room to motion sense but decided to only have it on if I'm away. I got tired of watching myself go across the room in my underwear. Alexa sometimes reads to me at night when my eyes are tired and I usually ask her the weather every day. I dropped all my cable TV and went to Roku for everything.
  7. Oh I see you wrote it in white.
  8. What word would that be?
  9. Can we put anything up here, I mean anything? Cautiously awaiting an anwer.
  10. Future FOH guy "Well it's either McDonalds or this. I think I would love knobs and faders." Disclaimer- A good sound guy is hard to find. They do exist, and for you we are appreciative. Our ear drums thank you.
  11. Good to hear experiences of others here. The table I have isn't a made for music kind of thing, and maybe not ideal, but it has a solid sort of ironing board leg layout where it unfolds and has two long 'feet' at each end. Seems pretty stable but a little low to the floor. About 3ft. high. Lower center of gravity but need to bend to access computer if I use one. I like the table you linked much better. I would be standing. As monitors they seem to work very well for them. I am seriously looking at it. Would be dual purpose as I could use it for a small 'gig'. Well I guess you would never have issue with not hearing the mix, that's for sure. The volume of your show must be high. Alternatively I could freeze recorded tracks in Omnisphere and add them to a show using Ableton. I had planned to solo though so it gets complicated. Here's a vid you might find interesting on backing tracks. A lot of musicians are only using a laptop, so I could save myself 2k on a PUSH 3. Push 2 used would be much less, but still, not sure if I really need it. Ableton can map to any midi controller for things like song start stop next song etc. Theoretically a song can be one long loop or it can be broken into segments and 'fired' off a controller. Some musicians who write their own tunes and play alone or with one other don't even use a click track if the have decent monitoring. Four drum stick counts in and they can follow the rest. I would be tasking two things at once instrument and voice plus managing the tracks with some kind of a controller. One task would be better and I don't want a guitar part in a track I could be playing. I have the 4 channel looper too. In an unplugged set that could be very useful.
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