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paulsmith435

How to input Sustain Pedal in PRV

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Hi

I've been trying to add some Pedal Sustain in the PRV but every tool I try just makes things worse.  I've tried using the Alt Key with the tools but no luck.  Old Cakewalk Tutorials do not show the correct method.  Does anyone have experience with this in Cakewalk by BandLab?  
Thanks, Paul

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Sustain is MIDI CC 64, so you need to add  the event to the control lane (at the bottom of the PRV) and then draw in the sustains (64-127 for Sustain, 0-63 for no Sustain)

see page 812 of the reference guide on detailed info about adding MIDI CC in PRV.

Peace,

Blindeddie

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49 minutes ago, Blindeddie said:

Sustain is MIDI CC 64, so you need to add  the event to the control lane (at the bottom of the PRV) and then draw in the sustains (64-127 for Sustain, 0-63 for no Sustain)

see page 812 of the reference guide on detailed info about adding MIDI CC in PRV.

Peace,

Blindeddie

Thanks for this.  I was struggling with this very thing yesterday, trying to insert a sustain pedal on/off in PRV to keep chords from overlapping/ running into  each other, as one would do with an actual pedal on a piano.  Lots to learn  in midi.  One thing the manual referenced was paying attention to what the event filter on the track is set to. I’ll have to explore that further. Thanks again. 

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1 hour ago, Blindeddie said:

Sustain is MIDI CC 64, so you need to add  the event to the control lane (at the bottom of the PRV) and then draw in the sustains (64-127 for Sustain, 0-63 for no Sustain)

see page 812 of the reference guide on detailed info about adding MIDI CC in PRV.

Peace,

Blindeddie

A lot of newer pianos actually have half pedaling that goes gradually from no sustain to full sustain 0 - 127 with 64 being half pedaling.    So be mindful you may have to account for that as well.

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Posted (edited)

On a synth that supports it, any value between 0 and 127 is technically "half-pedaling".  Synths that don't support it will treat anything <64 as 0 (pedal up), and anything >= 64 as 127 (pedal down).

But what I really wanted to say is that I strongly encourage every MIDI composer to acquire some kind of MIDI keyboard controller with pedal , modulation and pitch controls . Learning to play a keyboard in real time with even minimal facility will greatly simplify the process of creating MIDI, even if you have to do a bunch of editing to fix mistakes. You can even record notes and pedal (or other controller) events in separate passes if need be. 

Edited by David Baay
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Hi David, I do have a pedal.  Maybe I wasn't too clear... I simply want to correct some pedalling rather than playing through portions of the song again.  I seem to have figured it out now.  Click at the top left of the pedal graphic to move it to pedal sooner and to the bottom right to allow a longer sustain.  Thanks to everyone who has offered help!

 

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1 hour ago, David Baay said:

On a synth that supports it, any value between 0 and 127 is technically "half-pedaling".  Synths that don't support it will treat anything <64 as 0 (pedal up), and anything >= 64 as 127 (pedal down).

Technically 0 is no pedaling, 127 is full pedaling. 64 is half pedaling, 32 is 1/4 pedaling 96 is 3/4 pedaling.  Saying anything between 0-127 is ‘half pedaling’ simply is incorrect. There’s other fractions between these values as well using division.  You’re not at half until you reach 64.  😄✌️ I agree with you on the other stuff.

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Hmmm... okay, guess I'll buy that. I've never really heard anyone say or write 'quarter-pedaling' or 'eighth-pedaling', but Google does find instances.  In my experience, people mostly just say 'partial' or 'half' pedaling to distinguish it from 'full'.  As an aside, I'm currently having to re-develop my pedaling technique since acquiring a Yamaha grand piano last year after 30 years of playing digitals almost exclusively. I'm still a bit of a lead-foot, but getting better.  ;^)    I just love all the harmonics that come out when everything is ringing, but it can get muddy fast. 

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On a real piano you really figure out how to work the pedals in their full glory.  Growing up on acoustic piano I really miss it when a library doesn’t have continuous CC64 (0-127).  Vienna’s Synchron Pianos nail it beautifully!! Roland keyboards do a great job of it as well. 

When I was using Quantum Leap East West Pianos I created a script for  Bome’s midi translator and Cakewalk ACT make their Pianos Sustain pedal Continuous and gradual for pedaling as well as repedaling (lift pedal then repedal before the strings are completely dampened.  Worked really well.  

Vienna’s new pianos are amazing though.  CFX and Steinway D.  Their new Blüthner has a fourth set of strings  in the mid to higher range tuned an octave up from the strings they’re next to. They don’t get struck by the hammer but simply vibrate sympathetically.  A Blüthner is what was played on ‘Let It Be’.

✌️

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