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IMAGINE Drums by VintageDrumSamples

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- Clear and Easy to use Interface for a whole LUDWIG drumkit
- Multi Round-Robin and articulations
- up to 12RR
- kick / snare / high hat/ high hat open / snarerolls / crash / ride / tom 1 / tom2
- GM Mapped
- Kontakt 5.4.3 and above
- WAV files are included (24bit/48khz)
- Straight Into Tape (15 IPS)
- Mixready (you get what you hear)

https://vintagedrumsamples.gumroad.com

Edited by facets

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Thee John Lemmon from The Beagles with Dingo on drums??? 

While it's not quite as bad as using the artist's actual name, especially from a humor value perspective,  from a legal perspective,  it's still an intellectual property infringement as is using his image in your product marketing. Not that it's going to get on the radar of Lennon's estate. But if you ever got a C&D letter from Lennon's estate, just rename the product.  Look to EastWest for a better way to do naming. They call their Beatles focused library package "Fab Four," which I take it,  they researched and found they could use (although there's no guarantee on that research having been done).  Also,  the late Alan White was the drummer on that song you’re attempting to imitate in your demo.  

Edited by PavlovsCat

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Can’t see an issue with this developer alluding to the names of artists. They emulate the sounds very well plus the playing’s very good. One wonders how they put it all together though.

Also in a post a few months there was an inaccurate statement that the developer was using commercial vinyl for their vinyl samples. However, their website only admits to ‘vinyl’. No mention of commercial.

BTW Alan White was the drummer on Imagine, Andy White (no relation) played on on Love Me Do.

 

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30 minutes ago, Ric said:

Can’t see an issue with this developer alluding to the names of artists. They emulate the sounds very well plus the playing’s very good. One wonders how they put it all together though.

Also in a post a few months there was an inaccurate statement that the developer was using commercial vinyl for their vinyl samples. However, their website only admits to ‘vinyl’. No mention of commercial.

BTW Alan White was the drummer on Imagine, Andy White (no relation) played on on Love Me Do.

 

Oops, yeah,  I meant the recently departed Alan White (I've been a Yes fan since I was a kid and Alan was also Yes' drummer besides doing a lot of studio work back in the 70s when he played with Lennon on songs like Imagine and Instant Karma).  As far as using a famous artist's face and playing off his name, legally it violates international law intellectual property rights.  It's why you find respected sample developers don't use an artist's name or likeness without their express permission. This is international intellectual property rights 101 and applies in just about every nation around the globe with the exception of North Korea.

Years ago, ReFX found this out the hard way and was served with a C&D notice from Roland for using one of their brand names, I think it was Juno.  I gave Michael Kleps, the founder, some advice on how to go forward and helped him rename the product. Very simply,  consider that a celebrity's name is protected from being used for commercial use without their express permission.  You can't legally call your product John Bonham Drums or John Lennon Guitar without a legal agreement with the artist -- or their estate, in the examples I just gave.  I see this developer and his other business, regularly infringes on intellectual property rights and his copy about sampling commercial albums should be of  serious concern,  as you can't do that legally without licensing it. And that's really basic stuff anyone in the business should know. The site's copy literally states they sampled beats from old commercial record albums.  Someone owns those rights and you can't legally record them and sell it, and if you buy those samples and use them in your music -- let's say you end up with a hit song. The owners of that recording your sample came from, say the record company and artist, have a slam dunk lawsuit against you, and you can expect that you're either going to be turning over alot or all of the money you made on that song to them. I'd share some stories, but I have an NDA stopping me from sharing a really great one. But it's as straightforward as what I explained.  

Edited by PavlovsCat
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16 hours ago, PavlovsCat said:

The owners of that recording your sample came from, say the record company and artist, have a slam dunk lawsuit against you, and you can expect that you're either going to be turning over alot or all of the money you made on that song to them

I completely understand this. I'm not suggesting anyone do it, but theoretically how would someone doing this be found out? If it's really distinctive, someone might recognise it, but I would have thought e.g. most snare samples sound fairly generic. Or does it get picked up by copyright detection technology?

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3 hours ago, antler said:

I completely understand this. I'm not suggesting anyone do it, but theoretically how would someone doing this be found out? If it's really distinctive, someone might recognise it, but I would have thought e.g. most snare samples sound fairly generic. Or does it get picked up by copyright detection technology?

Of course they could use software detection,  but yes, the odds of getting on the radar of whoever they lifted the samples from may be small unless it's super distinctive and your song gets very popular. So, in most cases, it boils down to ethics. Do we steal if we can get away with it or do we operate ethically even though the odds are that we'd never get caught for engaging in intellectual property theft. 

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18 minutes ago, PavlovsCat said:

So, in most cases, it boils down to ethics. Do we steal if we can get away with it or do we operate ethically even though the odds are that we'd never get caught for engaging in intellectual property theft. 

The bottom line.

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