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razor7music

Anyone Have to Put Limits on Track Numbers?

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On 7/2/2019 at 4:45 PM, razor7music said:

PS - I was referring to additional tracks (instruments, layers of instruments) versus comping different song parts on different tracks. So, if my arrangement has 4 parts, say verses, pre-hooks, choruses, bridge, then other than the drums, more times than not I'm going to have 4 tracks of each instrument. I do that so if I need to tweak anything on an instrument for a certain part of the song, I can easily do that on that respective track.

Just clarifying--but I see most of you knew what I meant already.

I think that's the way many are working (spreading sections of each part across tracks (for separate processing of each section, etc).

This is why many productions are using more than 24 tracks.  

If you listen to any one point in the song, there's usually not that many different parts playing simultaneously.

 

With BG Vocals, it's common practice to triple-track each harmony part (left, center, right).  

This helps a couple of voices sound more like a group of singers.

If you've got three-part harmony... and put each section on separate tracks, the track count quickly adds up.

 

In the case of mocking strings/winds/brass, it adds realism to have each part tracked individually.

 

In my case, when doing "punch-ins" to fix a section, I don't like punching-in on the original track.

All my punch-ins are recorded on separate tracks.

 

I prefer DAWs that allow processing per-clip in addition to per-track. 

DAWs that don't allow processing per-clip force the user to spread  those parts across multiple tracks.

 

I do think there's also the, "Because we can!" factor.

With the processing power available today, folks are going to use it... (for better or worse)

 

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14 minutes ago, Jim Roseberry said:

With BG Vocals, it's common practice to triple-track each harmony part (left, center, right).   

This helps a couple of voices sound more like a group of singers.

Rippin a page right out of Roy Thomas Baker's book

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