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cclarry

Voices for cloud-based singing synthesizer Emvoice One are half-off.

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Mac/PC, VST/AU/AAX, free demo. Requires active internet connection to use.

Emvoice One "Lucy" (English female) = $99, reg. $199
Emvoice One "Jay" (English male) = $99, reg. $199

This is cheaper than their Black Friday/Holiday 2021 sale, when they were $119.

https://emvoiceapp.com/

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Posted (edited)

Thanks Larry.

They sound good but the main thing that puts me off Emvoice is the requirement for an Internet connection as the vocal performances are generated remotely. Also means that if the company ever disappears, no more Emvoice vocals.

I have recently been trying the demo of Synthesizer V and even the demo voicebank Eleanor Forte AI sounds really good.

Check out this thread for more info.

Also, the KVR thread contains up to the minute information.

https://www.kvraudio.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=509932

Just need to be wary of some of the individual voicebank license details (see KVR thread).

Edited by ZincT
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From all my years on the music forums, it seems a heck of a lot of us are decent musicians, but can't sing well. I think there should be some kind of forum connections between people who can play or play and write music well and good vocalists interested in singing on others' productions. Maybe there is and I just don't know about it? 

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32 minutes ago, bitflipper said:

There is a third path: sing it yourself and get really good with Melodyne.

or get better at singing and less use of Melodyne, singing is not always about pitch

I wonder if we have gotten too obsessive with pitch being in the exact center.   There are zillions of recordings that existed before DAWs were vocals and wind instruments didn't hit the exact center.  No matter how great a vocal take is we reference it through Melodyne which mean we use our eyes more than our ears.  We do live in an age though were there are less talented singers.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, bitflipper said:

There is a third path: sing it yourself and get really good with Melodyne.

That's what I've been doing so far (with mixed results!) :)  

Also, not so easy when I want a female vocal.

Edited by ZincT

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4 hours ago, PavlovsCat said:

From all my years on the music forums, it seems a heck of a lot of us are decent musicians, but can't sing well. I think there should be some kind of forum connections between people who can play or play and write music well and good vocalists interested in singing on others' productions. Maybe there is and I just don't know about it? 

Isn't that what Bandlab is all about to begin with?

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1 hour ago, kitekrazy said:

singing is not always about pitch

Singing is not all about pitch, that's a fact. But neither is Melodyne. There's way more to it than just scootching the line up 'n down. It also handles transitions, phrasing, formants, dynamics, vibrato, and timing. That's why I said "really good" -  meaning to go beyond its basic functions.

And realistically,  achieving proficiency with Melodyne is within the reach of more people than will ever become really good singers.

All this is just a little tongue-in-cheek. Everyone should work on their singing, just as everyone should practice their instrumental chops. We can always get better at whatever we do.

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15 minutes ago, ZincT said:

...not so easy when I want a female vocal.

I once needed an angelic chorus in a song, so I recruited two of my teenage granddaughters. They were rather reluctant, though, as neither of them considered themselves singers.

However, once I showed them what Melodyne could do, plus the magic of double-tracking, EQ and reverb, their confidence was greatly boosted and in the end we got some really nice results.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, bitflipper said:

I once needed an angelic chorus in a song, so I recruited two of my teenage granddaughters. They were rather reluctant, though, as neither of them considered themselves singers.

However, once I showed them what Melodyne could do, plus the magic of double-tracking, EQ and reverb, their confidence was greatly boosted and in the end we got some really nice results.

I've had similar experiences myself with my daughter and some of her schoolfriends. I used Melodyne and "recorded doubles" a lot. They were amazed at the final results.

I am constantly amazed at what can be done with Melodyne, and I finally upgraded from Editor to Studio recently so I'm looking forward to delving into that. 

There was a video I watched a few years ago from a Melodyne product specialist (Stefan Lindlahr I think) who was involved in the development of Melodyne and his video really upped my Melodyne game.  That and upgrading from Assistant to Editor at the same time!

Edited by ZincT

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1 minute ago, bitflipper said:

I once needed an angelic chorus in a song, so I recruited two of my teenage granddaughters. They were rather reluctant, though, as neither of them considered themselves singers.

However, once I showed them what Melodyne could do, plus the magic of double-tracking, EQ and reverb, their confidence was greatly boosted and in the end we got some really nice results.

I recently did a half-serious attempt of using different tricks (including pitch shifting with Melodyne) to make my singing sound like a mob of children singing a nursery rhyme. I'm a bass baritone, so I knew it probably wouldn't work but I wanted to try anyway.

The result sounded like a drunken amateur drag queen karaoke performance.

So yeah, I'm looking at Synthesizer V very closely, too. Sounds amazing.

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7 minutes ago, pseudopop said:

I recently did a half-serious attempt of using different tricks (including pitch shifting with Melodyne) to make my singing sound like a mob of children singing a nursery rhyme. I'm a bass baritone, so I knew it probably wouldn't work but I wanted to try anyway.

The result sounded like a drunken amateur drag queen karaoke performance.

So yeah, I'm looking at Synthesizer V very closely, too. Sounds amazing.

Sample that to Kontakt and make some money.  It would be a first.

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26 minutes ago, bitflipper said:

 

Singing is not all about pitch, that's a fact. But neither is Melodyne. There's way more to it than just scootching the line up 'n down. It also handles transitions, phrasing, formants, dynamics, vibrato, and timing. That's why I said "really good" -  meaning to go beyond its basic functions.

And realistically,  achieving proficiency with Melodyne is within the reach of more people than will ever become really good singers.

All this is just a little tongue-in-cheek. Everyone should work on their singing, just as everyone should practice their instrumental chops. We can always get better at whatever we do.

You wouldn't have to pay a singer for a lot of takes.

Singing is not a rocket science but the most difficult to master.

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5 hours ago, ZincT said:

I am constantly amazed at what can be done with Melodyne, and I finally upgraded from Editor to Studio recently so I'm looking forward to delving into that. 

There was a video I watched a few years ago from a Melodyne product specialist (Stefan Lindlahr I think) who was involved in the development of Melodyne and his video really upped my Melodyne game.

This fellow tipped me off to several features that I either hadn't stumbled upon or that were newly added in the last release (for which I dragged my heels for a year, waiting for the price to go down).

4 hours ago, kitekrazy said:

Singing is not a rocket science...

Right again, kite.

Some of the singers I've worked with have been as dumb as a box of rocks,  although I have to admit they do tend to have the best hair.

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9 hours ago, PavlovsCat said:

From all my years on the music forums, it seems a heck of a lot of us are decent musicians, but can't sing well. I think there should be some kind of forum connections between people who can play or play and write music well and good vocalists interested in singing on others' productions. Maybe there is and I just don't know about it? 

ircam trax v3 has the ability to take a male voice and transform into female (or vice versa) based on source and result type.

Tis expensive ($399). I've used it with moderate success. Of course you can't expect lead vocal quality but 'sit the mix' bg vocals are quite acceptable. 

You can try it for free.

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Posted (edited)

If these voices are half off, I'd definitely be using Melodyne.

Edited by PhonoBrainer

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38 minutes ago, PhonoBrainer said:

If these voices are half off, I'd definitely be using Melodyne.

Taking the doughnut round the hole view they're also half on. 😀

 

 

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2 hours ago, paulo said:

Taking the doughnut round the hole view they're also half on. 😀

 

 

I bet you're a singer. Typical.

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1 hour ago, PhonoBrainer said:

I bet you're a singer. Typical.

No. I just like doughnuts.

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