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FREE DOWNLOAD: Future Chords Midi Pack by Red Sounds

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We are back with another blockbuster FREEBIE! Introducing the Future Chords Midi Pack from Red Sounds – now FREE to download for the next few days!

This pack contains 1673 drag & drop MIDI Chords for Future bass, EDM, Future RnB, OVO Style Hip-Hop, Chillwave and more!

This pack works in every major DAW. Chords were converted from Red Sound’s best-selling Future Chords for Cthulhu Pack, so you don’t need Cthulhu VST to use them. Chord selection is everything in today’s modern music! Whether you know music theory or not – Future Chords MIDI Pack is a handy tool for the modern producer (beatmaker).

Limited FREE DOWNLOAD, don’t miss out!

Offer Page: https://audioplugin.deals/future-chords-midi-pack-by-red-sounds/
Offer ends on Dec. 16th, 2021 at midnight eastern time

KEY FEATURES

  • 40 FOLDERS (PRESETS), 896 CHORDS
  • YOUR GO-TO CHORDS
  • SUITABLE FOR MANY GENRES (EDM/FUTURE BASS/FUTURE RNB/HIP-HOP AND MORE)
  • EASY TO USE
  • GOOD FEEDBACK FROM THE PROS
  • MAKE MUSIC FASTER

 

 

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Ok, so I didn't want to believe it but it is exactly what it says on the tin: 1673 midi files that each contain a single chord. That's it.

Can someone please explain to me why someone would use these? Is there some mystic workflow or software where selecting a midi file is actually faster and easier than hitting a C major on your keyboard? Or is this for people who don't have a keyboard? For people who want to make music without learning any theory?

Not judging, simply curious.

Though admittedly, I have now learned that you should use a different variation of C major for future bass and chillwave, and that Spanish hip-hop doesn't use C major at all (only C min, but you can use two variations of it). 🤷‍♂️

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9 minutes ago, pseudopop said:

Ok, so I didn't want to believe it but it is exactly what it says on the tin: 1673 midi files that each contain a single chord. That's it.

Can someone please explain to me why someone would use these? Is there some mystic workflow or software where selecting a midi file is actually faster and easier than hitting a C major on your keyboard? Or is this for people who don't have a keyboard? For people who want to make music without learning any theory?

Not judging, simply curious.

Though admittedly, I have now learned that you should use a different variation of C major for future bass and chillwave, and that Spanish hip-hop doesn't use C major at all (only C min, but you can use two variations of it). 🤷‍♂️

I suspect that the chords are not your typical three/four note chords, but consist of different voicings, intervals and inversions. They might be useful to feed into an arpeggiator or some other midi manipulator as well.

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4 minutes ago, Doug Rintoul said:

I suspect that the chords are not your typical three/four note chords, but consist of different voicings, intervals and inversions. They might be useful to feed into an arpeggiator or some other midi manipulator as well.

Ok, that makes sense. So I assume there is software that allows you load these files in bulk and then you just hit C on your keyboard and you can easily switch between all variations that are available?

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34 minutes ago, pseudopop said:

Ok, so I didn't want to believe it but it is exactly what it says on the tin: 1673 midi files that each contain a single chord. That's it.

Can someone please explain to me why someone would use these? Is there some mystic workflow or software where selecting a midi file is actually faster and easier than hitting a C major on your keyboard? Or is this for people who don't have a keyboard? For people who want to make music without learning any theory?

Not judging, simply curious.

Though admittedly, I have now learned that you should use a different variation of C major for future bass and chillwave, and that Spanish hip-hop doesn't use C major at all (only C min, but you can use two variations of it). 🤷‍♂️

I will take a look but can probably guess work flow(s) that makes these useful.  I could share a few scenarios if you really are curious.

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1 hour ago, dubdisciple said:

I will take a look but can probably guess work flow(s) that makes these useful.  I could share a few scenarios if you really are curious.

If it's not too much trouble, though a YouTube link or a name of a software would suffice, too. I am genuinely curious, because this concept is new to me and I'm interested to find out if it's something I could use myself.

Edit: Or I could just google "how to use midi chord files"...

Edit2: Nope, didn't find anything useful. Which is interesting in itself.

Edited by pseudopop
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3 hours ago, pseudopop said:

If it's not too much trouble, though a YouTube link or a name of a software would suffice, too. I am genuinely curious, because this concept is new to me and I'm interested to find out if it's something I could use myself.

Edit: Or I could just google "how to use midi chord files"...

Edit2: Nope, didn't find anything useful. Which is interesting in itself.

You are not constantly bombarded by Unison MIDI chord pack or NIKO chord pack ads on YouTube??  

I'd imagine one would use this in a similar way, other than if these are only individual chords the user would have to actually experiment or know some theory to get usable results.

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5 hours ago, pseudopop said:

1673 midi files that each contain a single chord. That's it

I thought it was only a certain company that likes to advertise on YouTube that sold this type of product.

4 hours ago, pseudopop said:

Ok, that makes sense. So I assume there is software that allows you load these files in bulk and then you just hit C on your keyboard and you can easily switch between all variations that are available?

You could try something like reMIDI; not sure how many different variations you could load at once though

https://www.pluginboutique.com/product/3-Studio-Tools/72-Utility/5935-reMIDI

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I’ve learned, seen, and heard more chords through Scaler than any device or midi pack on the planet.  They’re all in there.  I don’t see why I would ever need a bunch of files like this when Scaler not only reveals them to me but also makes relationships to related chords (and not so related chords) on the fly and then builds scale-specific melody/arpeggios.

Edited by Marc Cormier
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Thanks for your patience.  I will start by saying, part of the answer lies in the website that makes this particular chord pack. These were originally meant to be used in Cthulhu and were arranged into progressions banks. Some of these these are not chord packs that have basic major and minor bass chords but chords a beginner or even intermediate player are likely play casually. This workflow is a little more obvious when done this way. Here is an example of how they were meant to be used :

 

 

 

They decided to convert them to midi files which are more universal, but for this particular application less intuitive.  Although less intuitive, there are several ways and reasons to use. Disclaimer: I wouldn't personally use first route since tools exist like the program this was designed for. 

 

1. Creating presets for aids such as Chthulu or(  more likely in the case of someone who bought midi version of a cthulu pack ) the free chording progression tool Ripchord.  Admittedly, this sounds tedious, but once progression presets are made they can be re-used in countless ways. 

2. More practical and efficient would be dragging into a program like Scaler seems a more efficient way to use. Dragging a single chord into scaler opens up new worlds by having the ability to generate multiple chord progressions, both typical and unconventional via the suggestion and modal exchange functions.  Throw in other features like ability to play the results as strums, humanize and so on and one chord ends up having much more potential than the sum of the literal notes. If I have time later, I can show how practical this is for creating samples by actually dragging one of those into scaler.

3. The ability to study chords in a way that is more practical in modern music. Pop music and EDM are made mostly on piano rolls and grids rather than staffs. Visually, seeing a chord laid out on a piano roll is more useful for a person born into a world of DAW based music. Remember, every single music theory fact we know is based on constructs created to make transcribing what exists as sound easier to translate to reproducible forms.  For the DAW based musician the relationship between notes makes more sense laid out on a piano roll. They may not understand the names of what they are doing but this does not stop them from doing it. I ha. ve watched kids in FL studio instinctively move the bass notes up from a chord to give themselves more room for actual bass instruments without being able to describe these things in music theory terms.  Recognizing the visual relationships of things like diminished and sus chords becomes habit after awhile for them.

 

You may ask, why not just play the chords? Good question with a few answers:

 

1) knowing a chord and physically being able to play it are two different things. There are chords I can use my understanding of music theory to construct but would butcher playing , especially if I had to chain together progressions of them.

2) Using something like this and physically playing too are not mutually exclusive.  I have watched kids evolve from using chord packs to playing them depending in composition technique.

3) Some people have no controller and use various piano roll techniques that involve laying chords out and manipulating notes for melodies example:

 

I could probably think of more, but hopefully this gives some insight even if it doesn't inspire you to go this route 😂

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Brian Walton said:

You are not constantly bombarded by Unison MIDI chord pack or NIKO chord pack ads on YouTube??  

I'd imagine one would use this in a similar way, other than if these are only individual chords the user would have to actually experiment or know some theory to get usable results.

unison ads are part of why i pay to not have youtube ads.  This deal is slightly different since these are not progressions but single chords. Believe it or not there are hacks( for lack of better word at the moment) to use a single chord without really knowing theory. A chord on a piano roll can easily used to create a progression even if the user doesn't understand why it works.  Many of the kids that have been in my studio know absolutely zero theory and were using visual hacks to generate melodies that were very baroque like and often ended up as phrygian or dorian mode. In fact, when I had them listen closely to some Bach they realized they were somewhat reinventing the wheel .

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49 minutes ago, Marc Cormier said:

I’ve learned, seen, and heard more chords through Scaler than any device or midi pack on the planet.  They’re all in there.  I don’t see why I would ever need a bunch of files like this when Scaler not only reveals them to me but also makes relationships to related chords (and not so related chords) on the fly and then builds scale-specific melody/arpeggios.

I mentioned scaler in my response. I agree 100% scaler is best way to make use of these. No way would I pay for a pack of single chords when i could generate them in scaler. Since these are free, they would probably work well at seeding scaler's new suggestion features.

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2 hours ago, Brian Walton said:

You are not constantly bombarded by Unison MIDI chord pack or NIKO chord pack ads on YouTube??  

I'd imagine one would use this in a similar way, other than if these are only individual chords the user would have to actually experiment or know some theory to get usable results.

No, never heard of them. I guess my browser's ad blocker works better than I realized.

1 hour ago, Marc Cormier said:

I’ve learned, seen, and heard more chords through Scaler than any device or midi pack on the planet.  They’re all in there.  I don’t see why I would ever need a bunch of files like this when Scaler not only reveals them to me but also makes relationships to related chords (and not so related chords) on the fly and then builds scale-specific melody/arpeggios.

That was my thought exactly. But I've learned that I am often ignorant about many things, so I thought it better to ask than to assume something.

52 minutes ago, dubdisciple said:

[snip]

I could probably think of more, but hopefully this gives some insight even if it doesn't inspire you to go this route 😂

Okay, I hear what you're saying, but I feel there is a better way to do everything you listed, even if you're missing a keyboard. Normally these cost money, so investing in something like scaler would be a much better move, like you more or less said yourself.

But I suppose there wouldn't be supply if there wasn't demand. Or perhaps supply has created demand?

In any case, if whoever is reading this finds midi chords useful, I'd like to apologize if my initial post made me sound like an elitist jerk. I support whatever helps people create music and I understand that we all have different backgrounds and different approaches. I was just so confused by this that I didn't pay much attention on how I worded my message, and after I re-read it I realized it may have come across as demeaning. That was not intended.

As a peace offering I'd like to share something I found when I was investigating this: Free Midi Chords and progressions offers over 7400 free midi chords and progressions in a single package. If midi chords is your thing you might find it useful.

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1 hour ago, pseudopop said:

No, never heard of them. I guess my browser's ad blocker works better than I realized.

That was my thought exactly. But I've learned that I am often ignorant about many things, so I thought it better to ask than to assume something.

Okay, I hear what you're saying, but I feel there is a better way to do everything you listed, even if you're missing a keyboard. Normally these cost money, so investing in something like scaler would be a much better move, like you more or less said yourself.

But I suppose there wouldn't be supply if there wasn't demand. Or perhaps supply has created demand?

In any case, if whoever is reading this finds midi chords useful, I'd like to apologize if my initial post made me sound like an elitist jerk. I support whatever helps people create music and I understand that we all have different backgrounds and different approaches. I was just so confused by this that I didn't pay much attention on how I worded my message, and after I re-read it I realized it may have come across as demeaning. That was not intended.

As a peace offering I'd like to share something I found when I was investigating this: Free Midi Chords and progressions offers over 7400 free midi chords and progressions in a single package. If midi chords is your thing you might find it useful.

You sounded genuinely curious and not like a jerk at all. I have seen posts from elitists and I would have ignored it. I see such opportunities as opportunities to exchange and find understanding rather than agreement.  Thanks for convo and progressions

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It's a good question. I don't see an obvious use FOR ME, but I do use EZkeys and the Studio One chord track as a compositional aids. I have scalar but have not used it in anger.  I also have a large wall chart of scales and chords above my keyboard which is very useful.

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I decided to actually put theory into action using a random chord from this pack scaler and a timer set for 5 minutes to come up with a base for lofi song. The first thing I noticed was that it was a chord I would not typically play live on a keyboard but might draw .  I let scaler do the work, even though, I could have used studio ones built in circle of 5ths and chord track to achieve similar vibe.   I attached a few screen shots to show how crazy staff view shots look of relatively simple stuff for this type of music. please forgive quick and dirty mix and arrangement i didn't even bother to set levels . lol

chordshot1.png

 

 

chordshot2.png

chordshot3.png

chord test(2).mp3

Edited by dubdisciple
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