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Steev

Sultans of Swing Jammies

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Gotta LOVE the Bandlab Mix Editor. No it can't do what Cakewalk by Bandlab can do, but it's cross platform and quite proficient at running on Android, Apple, and Windows platforms, and CbB, or ANY other DAW for that matter can do that and the combination of the 2 are truly the stuff collaboration, recording and creating music dreams are made of in any way, shape or workflow imaginable. From MIDI or loop based composition to laying down and recording simple raw straight forward audio tracks like this, we are only restricted by our own limitations of our imagination.

 Because wanting MORE never got us where we are going, it only slows us down and truth be told, getting to the end of our journey doesn't rely on what tools we use, success solely depends on how well we use the tools that we have. 😉

Sultans of Swing by Emitters | BandLab

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Steev, I must have heard this song a million times but never as a cover.  Great job on what you did with it!  You kept a lot of the original sound but also made it your own version. 

To my ears the bottom is lacking a bit so  I think I would tweak the lower freqs up or lower the highs.   Just my take, that's all.

-Bjorn

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Steev

Exactly what Bjorn said!!

I don't think I've ever heard a cover of this either

Great job

Nigel

 

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Brave man to cover a guitarist where accidentals trip off his fingers like rain falls out of the sky (well here today anyway)

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I love Dire Straits and this is an excellent cover. I only ever saw one band at a gig once try to cover this and it wasn't pretty.

Great job all round 👏👏👏

Andy

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Thank you all VERY MUCH for your insightful critique and feedback. 🙏🏼 This project has been uploaded to Bandlab.com in multi-track form. You are all free join to "fork" it and revise it anyway you choose.. Only rules are you must join and be a member of Bandlab,com, hit the "fork" button, open the Mix Editor &  HAVE FUN! 😉

OK, this is an experiment I'm conducting on how well Cakewalk by Bandlab, Bandlab Mix Editor, and artists work and integrate together for collaboration. This thread is a great example of complexities of the questions of "Should we Record, Mix, & Master our own work?" And my typical almost dogmatic response is a resounding "NO! That's against the laws of the Music Business. Just because we 'can' break the rules doesn't mean we 'should'." Especially when we have only one environment to "record" in the same room we "mix" in and trying to get a good "master" with all conditions above thru the same monitoring source(s) to sound good on other devices anywhere & everywhere else.

Because these are the 3 vital processes of creating, polishing, & finishing music projects that we are all guilty of doing that we really shouldn't be doing ourselves, but typically can't afford to do otherwise.

So I came up with a basic set of rules to follow in this business of music pretty much where success was founded and forged on breaking the rules. 

1.) Always record tracks with as little to NO FX as possible & monitor with "closed back" pro grade studio Headphones in recording sessions to avoid crosstalk/bleed thru on tracks.

2.) Never do a "Mix" session a song project on the same day as the "Recording" sessions take place. Waiting a week is better because the farther your mindset gets from the original recording session mindset the better.

3.) NEVER use "closed back" pro grade studio Headphones designed for recording sessions to monitor a "Mixing Session" with, and expect good results thru speakers. And the only way to get an accurate image of how the mixing session sounds thru speakers is to LISTEN to it thru speakers you are intimately familiar with. Preferably thru near field studio monitors, but any speakers you are used to that sound good to you will do.

4.)  NEVER master the music on the same day as the "Mixing" session, and when you feel you have your mix right, "Export" it to stereo .wav or surround sound file @ the same resolution as the recording project.. Waiting a month is better. The longer you wait between these steps the more "objective" you become and the better your your chances of hearing the music as a "listener" as opposed the listening as a creator, the better your "Master" will be.

 

I have been influenced and inspired by many great guitarists over the decades but if there was any one in the #1 slot on my bucket list to jam with, depending on the mood I'm in, Mark Knopfler is always tied for 1st place. And it's not even that he's my favorite guitarist, though most certainly high on the list. It's hard to describe in works, because it's more of a purely natural feeling of relating to his or vibe then it is a personal conscience choice to sound like or copy him or his style. More like when I hear Dire Straits I instantly get connected "in the zone" and can imagine my self simply picking up my Strat envision me playing what he plays as he plays it, and remember every thing with less effort than it takes to remember any song I've ever written myself. 🤯

 

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Huuuuge Knopfler fan here! Your guitars are credible - I'd say your vocal needs to be more prominent in the mix, and maybe processed with a goal of adding some weight or heft to the vocal - like a multiband compressor primarily working on some lower frequencies? Just a thought. Maybe the vocal could be doubled? It's got some cool interpretations and inflections in your performance.

A blast from the past, nice job, thanks!

cheers,

-Tom

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