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Windows 11

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1 hour ago, Cecelius2 said:

If a 4th, 5th, 6th or 7th Gen CPU is stable and fine and runs Cakewalk, Cubase and Studio One 5 solidly right now, can one opt to run those DAW software programs  "perpetually” offline on Windows 10?

Cubase is eLicenser based so until that changes it will run just fine (I'm buying Elements now that there is a sale on upgrades at Steinberg). Have no idea about Studio One but Cakewalk will stop working and enter demo mode roughly after 6 months being offline and you will have to go online to unlock it eventually. Cloud based plugins and DAWs, like Reason, won't run offline at all, though I've read there is some additional 'driver' that you can install to run Reason offline but it will still need to call home every few weeks, sort of like what Roland Cloud is today. So there you go... the future likes 'online'. :(

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23 minutes ago, chris.r said:

Cubase is eLicenser based so until that changes it will run just fine (I'm buying Elements now that there is a sale on upgrades at Steinberg). Have no idea about Studio One but Cakewalk will stop working and enter demo mode roughly after 6 months being offline and you will have to go online to unlock it eventually. Cloud based plugins and DAWs, like Reason, won't run offline at all, though I've read there is some additional 'driver' that you can install to run Reason offline but it will still need to call home every few weeks, sort of like what Roland Cloud is today. So there you go... the future likes 'online'. :(

Thanks Chris.  Regarding Cakewalk, in theory, would it be possible to do offline activations from a separate computer with Win 11 and then transfer the activation codes to Cakewalk on the older Win10 computer?   [Sorry, but while I have used Cakewalk since the mid 1990's I have always stayed online and do not know much about offline activations].

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12 minutes ago, Cecelius2 said:

Regarding Cakewalk, in theory, would it be possible to do offline activations from a separate computer with Win 11 and then transfer the activation codes to Cakewalk on the older Win10 computer?

Ah yes the offline method, of course. I actually was among those who was asking for it long time. I forgot about it cause it is what it is, I mean, you would want to activate stuff offline and just have it done right? Not this time, it will work but then you'll have to repeat it every 6 months, which is, well not a huge, but still a bummer.

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1 hour ago, chris.r said:

Cubase is eLicenser based so until that changes it will run just fine (I'm buying Elements now that there is a sale on upgrades at Steinberg). Have no idea about Studio One but Cakewalk will stop working and enter demo mode roughly after 6 months being offline and you will have to go online to unlock it eventually. Cloud based plugins and DAWs, like Reason, won't run offline at all, though I've read there is some additional 'driver' that you can install to run Reason offline but it will still need to call home every few weeks, sort of like what Roland Cloud is today. So there you go... the future likes 'online'. :(

I'm not sure about Cubase or CbB, but I believe that once Studio One is activated, you would only need to go online for updates/upgrades.

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Thank you both for this helpful information.  While I will buy a new DAW desktop when the time is right, I am greatly relieved to know that my current desktop DAW computers will still work via offline activation.

I hope this was not too off topic.

Really!  Thanks!

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There's a theory going round that those minimum specs are actually for OEM PC builders. As with everything, time will tell...

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Linus did really good at covering some of the complaints this past weekend on WAN show and why some of this stuff is in place.

peo

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My computer appararently also won't run Windows 11, and I'm shocked, since it's only a couple of year's old and a monster built by Jim Roseberry--maybe you could weigh in on this subject, Jim, if you are still watching this forum?  I am reluctant to mess with BIOS settings, etc., because frankly I don't know what I'm doing on that level and if my machine goes out, I'm in big trouble...

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9 minutes ago, Dave Maffris said:

My computer appararently also won't run Windows 11, and I'm shocked, since it's only a couple of year's old and a monster built by Jim Roseberry--maybe you could weigh in on this subject, Jim, if you are still watching this forum?  I am reluctant to mess with BIOS settings, etc., because frankly I don't know what I'm doing on that level and if my machine goes out, I'm in big trouble...

Windows 10 will continue to be supported until 2025. So there's still plenty of time for things to be sorted out. Both for MS and the end user.

Microsoft has just been releasing an early copy of Windows 11 to the insider program, in order to assess what will really work and what won't. I'd wait until the dust settles a bit in a couple more years before planning for any hardware or BIOS changes...

The requirements will probably be a bit more finalized by then in any case. My 2 cents... 😉

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44 minutes ago, abacab said:

wait until the dust settles a bit in a couple more years before planning for any hardware or BIOS changes...

Best advice so far!!!

We have to remember that Win 10 ain't just gonna stop working when Win 11 debuts!!

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, Grem said:

Best advice so far!!!

We have to remember that Win 10 ain't just gonna stop working when Win 11 debuts!!

That's true, I'm still running 7 on my laptop and it's getting security updates from MS.

Edited by Old Joad
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7 minutes ago, Old Joad said:

I'm still running 7 on my laptop and it's getting security updates from MS.

Yep. 

And if Win 11 requires that my machine has TDM, TPM, or whatever it's called, and my machine doesn't have it? Oh well, it'll have to wait till I upgrade to a new machine. And that's won't happen for another 5 yrs!! At least!!

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Grem said:

Best advice so far!!!

We have to remember that Win 10 ain't just gonna stop working when Win 11 debuts!!

I feel like the dude who's making those whiny videos knows this very well, but he's just fishing for clicks (that's his hustle, though, so whatever)

The other thing is that I'm sure MS will relax their requirements (up to a certain point) as we get closer to the actual release date and even beyond

Ultimately, for good and bad, with Windows computers there's (almost) always a way... with Apple, the OS and the HW are so tightly integrated that if they say you can't, you can't (for good and bad)

Edited by Monomox
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Posted (edited)
56 minutes ago, Monomox said:

but he's just fishing for clicks (that's his hustle, though, so whatever)

Yeah, and they all milking it for everything it's worth!!!

56 minutes ago, Monomox said:

MS will relax their requirements (up to a certain point)

This is the exciting part!! Will they? Or won't they?

Edited by Grem

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The real issue is that Windows 10 is the most secure Windows so far. But that it's still a long way from it being a really secure OS (compared to Mac OS or Linux).

I think the real battle will be to see where Microsoft eventually sets the bar for security. There may be no way around the TPM requirement in the end, as that clearly has improved security as a priority. I think in the end it come down to which CPU's can support that feature.

I also agree with some pundits that suggest Microsoft needs to allow advanced users to opt out of the whole "secure OS" plan, and upgrade at their own risk. But that scenario leaves MS on the hook for potential security risks in the future. It will remain to be seen how much MS will relax. It almost looks like they have drawn a line in the sand that says, too bad, stay with Windows 10 if you don't measure up.

 

 

 

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They might relax some CPU requirements, but I don't think they will relax the security aspect. As much as some people dislike 'forced' Windows updates, it's probably been a good thing for computing in general. Yes, things can go wrong after an update, but it also means that millions of computers around the world are relatively up to date; not everyone is as computer literate as people here, and leaving their OS unpatched would just potentially result in a mass bot-net army that could potentially affect everyone else (e.g. spam-bots, DDoS bots).

Another example of MS trying to do their bit: on XP, an unactivated computer would be unusable; on W10 you get a watermark and customisations are disabled, but the OS is otherwise usable: nowadays MS would rather people use an unlicensed copy of Windows and get updates, than a dodgy pirate copy that doesn't get updates and gets infected with malware.

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Posted (edited)

As already mentioned, a hardware/software configuration being unsupported doesn't mean it won't work. It means if you contact MS's support line with a technical issue they can shrug you off.

The official "requirements" may be conservative at this point in time to weed out users with older hardware that could come with other problems (both hardware and software) besides Windows 11. The actual minimum recommended specs may change during the public testing phase.

My ancient Ivy Bridge Xeon board by Supermicro had a TPM module header, so perhaps that's not a reason to panic.

 

P.s. I don't get why people get excited and/or anxious over a new OS. For me it's like getting excited/anxious about buying new feet for my bed. It simply does not concern me enough to become emotionally involved in any measurable amount.

Edited by sarine

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5 hours ago, sarine said:

P.s. I don't get why people get excited and/or anxious over a new OS. For me it's like getting excited/anxious about buying new feet for my bed. It simply does not concern me enough to become emotionally involved in any measurable amount.

Getting new feet for your bed does not generally change the way you get into bed, nor does it render your current bed unusable for giving you a good nights sleep. 

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7 hours ago, Doug Rintoul said:

Getting new feet for your bed does not generally change the way you get into bed, nor does it render your current bed unusable for giving you a good nights sleep. 

Generally speaking, on average, a Windows update has never done that to me. It's just a chore and an annoyance.  I've heard more unfortunate experiences so maybe there is cause for concern for some people. In my experience every Windows version has improved on the previous - yes, even Vista. Not so sure about ME.

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