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My%20Name%20is%20Regret.jpg

 

Here's a handy name tag for anyone who isn't backing up. 😉

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Thank you for contacting Intel Technical Support.



We received your inquiry today and I understand that your unit is showing an error when running the Quick Diagnostic Scan using the latest version of the Intel Toolbox and also using a third party tool. We will be more than happy to look for a solution.



For us to better understand your issue, please provide us with the following information:



 

Proof of purchase of the SSD.

Was the unit working fine before or it is a new installation?

How's the SSD being used? As a storage, boot drive or in a RAID Volume?

What is the Operating System used and its version?



Please remove the partitions and volumes from the drive with Microsoft DiskPart* and then test the drive again. (Disclaimer: Intel is not responsible for lost user data. Before you proceed, back up any important data on your drive). Here you can find the instructions: https://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/articles/000022179/memory-and-storage.html



After the process is completed if the drive is still failling the test please open the Intel Toolbox and follow these steps:



1- On the home screen select the faulty SSD.

2- Click Export to save SMART attributes drive details and system information for the selected drive to a .csv (comma-separated values) file, which can be opened in a program such as Microsoft Excel*. You can save the file to any accessible location on your computer.

3- Attach the file to your response when replying.





What is interesting is what if you only have one system and the drive is your OS drive?

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Is this a drive failure? Sure I can format it and it appears everything is OK scanning from a drive dock. I don't want to open the case back up and put it in and test it since all SATA ports are used.

If it were a WD drive one would be shipped by now instead of this type of trouble shooting that the average person could not do.

DRIVE FAIL.JPG

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My response:

I cannot perform most of these requirements.   This was my OS drive.  After booting up the crashes were more frequent.   My only solution was to replace the drive (not Intel this time) and hook up this drive on a USB dock and be fortunate enough to retrieve the info and put on the new drive.  The support suggestions are not the most practical for most people.  I do not want to open the case back up and chance this drive locking up my system.   After transferring everything to the new drive I deleted all the information on the faulty Intel drive.
  I can't run a diagnostic using the SSD toolbox since it won't recognize the drive now that it is now on a drive doc.   I can use the one by Western Digital but drive errors are not always detected using a drive dock. SMART is always enabled in the BIOS.  I scan all of my drives each week.  I minimized writes to the drive.  It was at 75% health. There was never any firmware released either.
  I just want the drive replaced. This is the first time I've ever had to request an RMA with the Intel name on it.  This is the first time I ever had an OS drive fail.   The system would not be stable long enough to do any testing.  When an OS drive fails they only practical thing to do is get an immediate replacement instead of waiting on support. I now even have to restart the drive dock for this faulty drive to show up.
  If I were dealing with Western Digital a replacement would be on the way instead of doing more testing.  This drive is faulty. I have no confidence of ever wanting to do more suggestions.  Just replace the drive please!     

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The reason I'm posting all of this is how well manufacturers respond with faulty hardware.  Warranty is a priority when I buy but so is RMA service.  If service in unsatisfactory I broadcast it on forums, Facebook, Newegg, Amazon, pretty much leave no stone unturned.  I don't want to go through another set of hoops for this drive.  I've read similar responses on the Intel forum.

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 I am going to try those steps.  My drive shows no errors even after the lengthy test.  Odd that after the Intel SSD Toolbox finished it removed my drive from Windows.

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Intel knows everything is safer removed from Windows! 😆

 

(Good luck with it!😉)

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 I did most of the yada yada command line stuff.   The night before I put it in a dock and did the WD 3 hour drive test.  Everything was OK.  I popped it back in the system and ran Intel SSD Toolbox, everything was OK and then it removed the drive from Windows.  Deleted all of the partitions.  So the only possible failure is that it gets removed in the BIOS.   I let support know I will keep it in their as a storage drive and if it get removed in the BIOS I want it replaced.

 I guess I can throw a  library on it temporarily to get that SSD performance.   It's only 460GB.  I'm still sticking with my sets of 2TB platters.

 

 

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Remember you can easily change the location of your so-called "Library" files that Windows loves to dump on your OS drive.  Just right-click on one (e.g., Documents), select Properties then go to the Location tab (usually at the far right).  I have all of the Library folders (Pictures, Videos, Documents, etc.) pointed to a different drive.  Note that you can also install programs to other locations so, for select stuff, that extra SSD can come in handy!

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I had a couple Samsung SSD's that I thought were bad.  Samsung replaced one and a couple months later it failed again.  Then another drive started failing hooked to the next SATA port.    The SSD's worked fine with no errors on an external drive bay.  Turned out that SATA 3&4 ports were bad on my motherboard.  I was due for an upgrade so I replaced the CPU and motherboard almost 2 years ago.  The same drives that I thought were bad, are working fine now. 

I put the motherboard and CPU in my son's computer and it has been working fine as long as the the 2 SATA ports aren't used.

 

Jim

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On 4/7/2019 at 12:08 PM, craigb said:

Remember you can easily change the location of your so-called "Library" files that Windows loves to dump on your OS drive.  Just right-click on one (e.g., Documents), select Properties then go to the Location tab (usually at the far right).  I have all of the Library folders (Pictures, Videos, Documents, etc.) pointed to a different drive.  Note that you can also install programs to other locations so, for select stuff, that extra SSD can come in handy!

I guess I could use it for gaming but that's why I got a 500gb in the first place.

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 It appears mine has died.  It became a storage drive and sometimes it would show up in Windows and then this Intel Data storage app would kick it out.  So I switched the port with the DVD drive to rule out a failing SATA port and it doesn't even show up in the BIOS.   Of course to do an RMA Intel's support site is down for maintenance.   I'm a die hard WD HDD fan because of their support service and will probably trust their SSDs.

 My confidence in SSDs is not even close to HDDs. 

 

 

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Sounds like Intel's support site is running on the same SSD drives! 😆

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