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Andy Pomeroy

Guitar Sounds Generated with TH3 Cakewalk Version

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TH3 produces some great guitar sounds. I'd like to share some tones generated using TH3 Cakewalk Version & NadIR loaded with an IR created by Ola Englund. The point here is that all the software is free! I featured the 11 amps included running through the IR. These are raw guitar tones, no EQ or compression.

I may do a series featuring each amp paired with the various cabs, but for this comparison I picked the cab and then compared the 11 different amps through that cab. 

TH3 Cakewalk Version-Amps Comparison

Links are included in the description below the video. 

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That's really useful because co-incidentally, I recently recorded some audio guitar and applied the TH3 amp sim (Tweed Deluxe) and tubescreamer.  I thought something must be wrong somewhere because it sounded very muddy to me, with no dynamic. I've just gone through your video and was relieved to find that you seem to have had the same result with the Tweed Deluxe.

This is very odd. I actually have a real Fender Tweed Blues Deluxe and Tubescreamer and the output from these both individually and combined is nothing like the software representation...

Did you find that the other amp sims were nearer to the real thing?

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On 3/30/2019 at 11:39 AM, Ged said:

That's really useful because co-incidentally, I recently recorded some audio guitar and applied the TH3 amp sim (Tweed Deluxe) and tubescreamer.  I thought something must be wrong somewhere because it sounded very muddy to me, with no dynamic. I've just gone through your video and was relieved to find that you seem to have had the same result with the Tweed Deluxe.

This is very odd. I actually have a real Fender Tweed Blues Deluxe and Tubescreamer and the output from these both individually and combined is nothing like the software representation...

Did you find that the other amp sims were nearer to the real thing?

I don't own a Fender amp and have limited experience playing through one. As for these sounding like the real amps, my intention here was to show what could be done and not necessarily to say that this one sounds like a Marshall JCM 900, Dual Rectifier, etc. I simply want to show that a very good guitar sound can be produced.

I loaded the Tweed Deluxe with matching cab, a Shure SM57 over the cap and the TH3 Tube Nine (Tube Screamer) in front of the amp. Here's an example of something I liked and would record with:

 

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Thanks for that, sounds great! I should say that I only recently started exploring Cakewalk by Bandlab and I think it's brilliant that it's available for free with everything that comes with it. I'm quite new to working with DAWS software, especially software as sophisticated as this, and I'm still finding my way around. I'm only just beginning to appreciate it's huge potential. Many thanks again for your input.

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I used a Focusrite Scarlett Solo. Excellent interface. Just DI, completely dry guitar. Used to have an M-Audio Fast Track but had problems with popping, crackle and drop out because they stopped supporting and updating it's drivers some while ago.

I will be experimenting with plugging in from a real amp and pedals if I can get the gain down low enough, also with using a real mic positioned to a real amp.

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2 hours ago, Andy Pomeroy said:

James, if you watch the first post I explained the setup. I'll post here for you to watch. Feel to ask any questions:

TH3 Cakewalk Version-Amps Comparison

I did watch your excellent demo video.  I'm pleased with the raw result you get with your setup. However I'm not clear on how did you mix & route those 4 layered guitar tracks. Did you duplicate single take into 4 different tracks and mix them ? Coz to me it almost sounds like if you played 4 different takes. And how did you route the tracks into bus?

I also have Amplitube 4 & Line6 POD Farm, but when it comes to that fat rocking modern guitar sound, I still can not get the expected result like you do. I know it must have something to do with the technique. I'm still learning on how to layer guitar sound to get those huge sound without getting mud in the mix.

Thank you for sharing sir.

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Posted (edited)
On 3/31/2019 at 9:44 PM, James Argo said:

That's cool ! :) BTW, what guitar & preamp / interface did you use?

Too fatten up a guitar track you'll want to multi-track. It's common to dual track or quad track guitars to achieve this. For dual tracking try recording the same guitar part in two different takes. Then experiment by panning one track hard right and one hard left, or maybe 80% or 60% on the panning. Discover what you like.

In the example I quad tracked, I recorded the same part four times. I routed the four Guitar Channels (takes) to a dedicated Guitar Bus, routed the Guitar Bus to the Main Bus. Adjust the Guitar Channels so they don't clip, Then look at the Guitar Bus, make sure it's not clipping. If so, adjust the Guitar Channels accordingly. At this point we have the 4 Guitar Channels feeding the Guitar Bus. The Guitar Bus now acts as the main volume for all the guitars. I set the Guitar Channel panning as follows: one track hard right, one hard left, one 78% right, one 78% left. There was no processing on these tracks or buses. 

For a final guitar sound I would apply any EQ, compression, noise gate, etc. to the Guitar Bus. It's a waste of time to do each track separately and you'll get better results applying the processing to the Guitar Bus. Remember that the Guitar Bus feeds to the Main Bus.

1617371836_GuitarTracksRouting.jpg.9e20cd540a9e575657b5238ca47cc96f.jpg

Edited by Andy Pomeroy
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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, Andy Pomeroy said:

In the example I quad tracked, I recorded the same part four times. I routed the four Guitar Channels (takes) to a dedicated Guitar Bus, routed the Guitar Bus to the Main Bus. Adjust the Guitar Channels so they don't clip, Then look at the Guitar Bus, make sure it's not clipping. If so, adjust the Guitar Channels accordingly. At this point we have the 4 Guitar Channels feeding the Guitar Bus. The Guitar Bus now acts as the main volume for all the guitars. I set the Guitar Channel panning as follows: one track hard right, one hard left, one 78% right, one 78% left. There was no processing on these tracks or buses. 

For a final guitar sound I would apply any EQ, compression, noise gate, etc. to the Guitar Bus. It's a waste of time to do each track separately and you'll get better results applying the processing to the Guitar Bus. Remember that the Guitar Bus feeds to the Main Bus.

Thanks for the tip sir! That's very informative!

I remember I tried that long time ago. However -if I remember correctly-, I had problem with "energy build up"  in some certain frequencies, since all 4 parts were taken almost similar using same gears, setup, and plugins. Using different setting of comb filter EQ in each tracks helps a bit. Still the result sounds rather "mud" than "fat".  At the end I always record with real mic in front of real cabs, which gives me better sound.

Again, thanks for sharing sir 👍:)

Edited by James Argo

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57 minutes ago, Cosmo Kramer said:

I am interested, but there are NO LINKS below video at this time.

Have you seen the description section of his video on Youtube site?

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