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Brainworx Tolerance Modeling Technology is now Officially Patented!

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A search for Brainworx on the u.s. patent site  turned up nada.

 

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8 minutes ago, bitman said:

A search for Brainworx on the u.s. patent site  turned up nada.

 

It's most likely under "Tolerance Modeling Technology"

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Interesting-actually patented.  A bit different than Gibson and Fender, who’ve gotten over 60 years of marketing invested  in the terms “patent applied for” and “patent pending”. 

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18 hours ago, LAGinz said:

Interesting-actually patented.  A bit different than Gibson and Fender, who’ve gotten over 60 years of marketing invested  in the terms “patent applied for” and “patent pending”. 

Those terms simply means they applied for a patent and that a patent is being considered or analyzed by the patent office.

Welp, since they have a patent, now everyone can copy their technology, as you have to describe exactly what the thing does in the patent.

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3 hours ago, Bruno de Souza Lino said:

Those terms simply means they applied for a patent and that a patent is being considered or analyzed by 

True enough, but I think you missed my point. Fender stamps “patent pending” on a number of reproductions of older instruments or even derivations of older instruments because the older instrument itself had a “patent pending” label on it— not because the patent is still pending. In the case of Gibson, the term “PAF”refers to what is widely considered to be the holy grail of humbucking pickups because that original pickup had PAF stamped on it. Gibson (and even other manufacturers) have liberally used the term since to advertise that a particular pickup (supposedly) sounds like  and/or used similar manufacturing techniques to the pickup that originally had that stamp on it.

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41 minutes ago, LAGinz said:

True enough, but I think you missed my point. Fender stamps “patent pending” on a number of reproductions of older instruments or even derivations of older instruments because the older instrument itself had a “patent pending” label on it— not because the patent is still pending. In the case of Gibson, the term “PAF”refers to what is widely considered to be the holy grail of humbucking pickups because that original pickup had PAF stamped on it. Gibson (and even other manufacturers) have liberally used the term since to advertise that a particular pickup (supposedly) sounds like  and/or used similar manufacturing techniques to the pickup that originally had that stamp on it.

I see. If I'm not mistaken, schematics cannot be patented. That leaves Mike Fuller a bit annoyed, since he's been trying to patent the OCD for years without success.

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On 1/7/2021 at 12:23 PM, Yan Filiatrault said:

It came one day too late in Washington 

Now Now they were having a musical march up to the capital that is all ;)  Is that musical enough?  

Cool that they were able to get a patent.  Congrats to them!

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My favorite part ->

[A, f]=tf(r1, r2, c1, c2)     f=10.{circumflex over ( )}[−2:0.01:log10(50.e3)];     wc = sqrt(r2 * c2 * r1 * c1) / (r2 * c2 * r1 * c1);     g = (c1 * r2 + r2 * c2 + r1 * c1) / (r2 * c2 + r1 * c1);

 

Sounds great doesn't it?

 

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If i recall well , waves nls was also that concept and before PA , nope ?

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