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Cakewalk built in EQ vs. free plugin EQs

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How do you guys find the built in EQ compared to other (free) EQ plugins? Is it worth learning it, or would I be better off installing something else? I do like the fact that it comes readily available on Pro Channels! Also, does anyone know of a good Cakewalk EQ tutorial video?

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I would suggest watching this video. The EQ in the Cakewalk Pro Channel would be a good place to start. The Cakewalk Quadcurve flyout will give access to many of the features discussed in the Fab Filter Pro Q demonstration of the Q sweeps.

A couple of free EQs are mentioned in the video as well. But bottom line is learning how EQs work.

 

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5 minutes ago, iZiKKO said:

Thanks Abacab! Funny, I just watched it this morning. This guy Mike is great!

I love Mike's attitude, and his presentations! His videos should be mandatory for all Cakewalk newcomers (and a refresher for a few of us old timers)!

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To answer the first part of the original question, the ProChannel EQ is as good as or better than any free equalizer. It is also as good or better than many paid EQs.

Even if later on you decide to spend money on a high-end EQ, having first learned the process using what you already have you'll be a better-informed consumer and might prevent future buyer's remorse.

You're taking the right attitude about learning about EQs first. It's a far deeper subject than simply discussing EQ features or comparing different products. I'd suggest some of Dan Worrall's FabFilter tutorials. Most of what he explains is applicable to any EQ.

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17 hours ago, iZiKKO said:

How do you guys find the built in EQ compared to other (free) EQ plugins? Is it worth learning it, or would I be better off installing something else? I do like the fact that it comes readily available on Pro Channels! Also, does anyone know of a good Cakewalk EQ tutorial video?

A few years back I went to a seminar featuring a pro mixer from my city, Toronto.  I have been to several of these types of seminars and Pro Tools is always the DAW that is used, except for this particular one where the mixer (sorry can't remember his name) used Sonar Platinum (it was just before the Gibson abandonment).  I was really excited because I was a long time user.  On every track he used the Pro Channel EQ and needless to say the mix sounded great! Personally I use the PCEQ for general shaping and the Sonitus EQ for notching.  The one thing the PCEQ lacks is dynamics.  For Dynamic EQ I have the Waves version.  For flavour and additude I use SoundToys Sie-Q and more recently Arturia's excellent Pre TriA.  With both these you can drive the plugin for saturation and they sound great. Cheers.

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Let's not forget that so many of our favorite records from decades past were EQ'd solely on a console channel strip with just bass, mid and treble knobs. So yeh, knowing what you're doing is way more important than what tools you use to do it.

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18 hours ago, iZiKKO said:

How do you guys find the built in EQ compared to other (free) EQ plugins? Is it worth learning it, or would I be better off installing something else? I do like the fact that it comes readily available on Pro Channels! Also, does anyone know of a good Cakewalk EQ tutorial video?

You literally don't need any other EQs, just knowledge of how to use them.  

I have EQs that were not free and they are not any better than the Quad Curve with Flyout and generally not as convenient.  For a general purpose will work on every track EQ, the Cakewalk one is hard to beat.  

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6 minutes ago, bitflipper said:

Let's not forget that so many of our favorite records from decades past were EQ'd solely on a console channel strip with just bass, mid and treble knobs. So yeh, knowing what you're doing is way more important than what tools you use to do it.

Absolutely true, however back in those days the majority of those records were made in professional studios with great sounding rooms, expensive mics and analogue gear, not to mention the analogue consoles that imparted the colouration that we love.  Of course nothing trumps knowledge, especially with mic placement so as to limit frequency issues in the first place.  However the majority of us are recording digitally in home studios so I believe tools are also important, assuming you have reached a certain level of knowledge.  I could probably get by with basic bass, mid and treble knobs, but it wouldn't sound as good.  I record live instruments including drums in a small bedroom so notch equing is sometimes needed.  Because I don't have a high ceiling my drum overheads are probably too close to the cymbals and sometimes I use dynamic eq to tame the bell of the ride.  I find that harmonic distortion really helps me achieve that "analogue" sound.  So although I agree 100% with your statement, I think modern tools are necessary to deal with problems associated with home recordings in the digital realm.  I also believe that if the engineers back in the day had the tools we have today those records would have sounded better.  Just my opinion of course.

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On 12/4/2020 at 7:31 PM, iZiKKO said:

How do you guys find the built in EQ compared to other (free) EQ plugins? Is it worth learning it, or would I be better off installing something else? I do like the fact that it comes readily available on Pro Channels! Also, does anyone know of a good Cakewalk EQ tutorial video?

When the ProChannel EQ was designed (and the ProCh entirely) Cakewalk was owned by Roland who invested hard to compete with pro tier DAW's by releasing the SONAR X series.   So the ProChannel concept was very much ahead of the game in the move to bring back the fun and quality of analog consoles and outboard processing, so what you actually HEAR from the ProCh EQ is very similar to a console EQ. 

If you take notice of the ProCh Console emulator modules, they represent 3 analog consoles that compliment and even enhance the ProCh EQ.  This is done when you select the corresponding EQ type inside of the EQ plot window.  You can literally have every channel setup with the EQ+Compressor+Console modules to harness the characteristics of the actual analog boards that they are modeled after.  The only other DAW that I know of that comes with a "built in" analog console channel is Reason, who models after the SSL-9000.  

.....But Cakewalk has THREE console models to apply, muwahahaha!  (btw, SONAR Platinum - now Cakewalk by BandLab, use to sell for $499 retail 10 years ago so the ProCh aint no joke, bruh!) 

😄

 

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4 hours ago, Clovis Ramsay said:

The only other DAW that I know of that comes with a "built in" analog console channel is Reason, who models after the SSL-9000.  

 

There is Harrison Mixbus, which emulates a - surprise- Harrison analog console.

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That depends if you mix using your eyes or your ears. Many of the vintage emulation plugins are hard to get around for some people because it's just a bunch of knobs with labels and you "don't know" what's happening, since there's no visual cue like you have in some of the modern digital plugin EQs such ProChannel's, Pro Q3 and so on.

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