Jump to content

Tommy T

Members
  • Content Count

    8
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral
  1. Just did the comparison with VLC. I stand corrected. Although my ears can clearly tell the difference between the Cubase and the Cakewalk 32 bit float samples, the VLC codec settles the debate. I would like to personally acknowledge SCOOK, RBH, MSMCLEOD, BILL PHILLIPS, and NIGEL MACKAY. My apologies and thank you.
  2. Thank you Bill Phillips for your input. This is the scene where I say, "I guess we will just have to agree to disagree." Steinberg's Cubase, which also offers 32 and 64 bit floating point processing, also provides a "separate" 32 bit floating recording depth capability which has also been around a couple of years. I'm pretty sure they understand their software better. Having used both for decades, listening and comparing both for decades, my ears are trained to know the difference. There is a difference. The terms are not the same, period. Just a request for a feature that is not as frivolous as it may appear. Cakewalk can always just say no. Thanks again.
  3. Thank you for the response. You're right about the converters only sampling in integer format. At the same time, the reasoning for 32 bit floating point record bit depth is "precisely" because of the extra Dynamic Range benefit down at the ADC level. 32bit integer gives a max of 192db (really good obviously), but 32 floating points yields greater than 1500db. It is in this way the floating point sample with literally deliver a cleaner sound regardless of the ADC simply because of the massive decrease in subsonic noise. Of course you can't hear it ( just like 50khz of vinyl records) unless your ears are trained, but you can definitely hear and feel it. Thanks again. https://www.sounddevices.com/how-is-a-32-bit-float-file-recorded/ How Is 32-Bit Float Different From 32-Bit Integer? 32-bit float signals should not be confused with 32-bit fixed point. A 32-bit fixed point signal can accommodate considerable dynamic range, roughly 192 dB. While 32-bit integer offers a much larger dynamic range than 24-bit audio’s theoretical 144 dB, it pales when compared to the 1500 dB available to 32-bit float signals. If, for instance, processing adds 90 dB of gain to the 142 dB of dynamic range coming in, then 232 dB would be needed to capture this signal with no loss in headroom or noise. 32-bit float can do this, and 32-bit integer cannot.
  4. I would love to have a 32 bit floating point recording bit depth option available in the audio data menu to accompany the 16, 24, 32, and 64 bit recording depths like Cubase and others. Icing on the cake.
  5. The replies are great. I do have to disagree however. Unless specifically stated, they are very different. Internal processing does not determine recording bit depth, just how it is processed once the bit depth has already been determined, as noted by the pictures above. https://www.sounddevices.com/how-is-a-32-bit-float-file-recorded/ 32-Bit Float WAV Files The WAV file is a universal container for audio data, capable of storing material in a variety of bit depths, including 24-bit fixed point, 32-bit fixed point, and 32-bit floating point. In order to maintain the benefits of 32-bit floating point audio, audio data must be stored as 32-bit floating point. The audio application which is receiving the 32-bit float WAV files needs to support this format. While many audio applications do support 32-bit float, support is not yet universal. How Is 32-Bit Float Different From 32-Bit Integer? 32-bit float signals should not be confused with 32-bit fixed point. A 32-bit fixed point signal can accommodate considerable dynamic range, roughly 192 dB. While 32-bit integer offers a much larger dynamic range than 24-bit audio’s theoretical 144 dB, it pales when compared to the 1500 dB available to 32-bit float signals. If, for instance, processing adds 90 dB of gain to the 142 dB of dynamic range coming in, then 232 dB would be needed to capture this signal with no loss in headroom or noise. 32-bit float can do this, and 32-bit integer cannot.
  6. Again, thank you for your response. Internal processing of 32bit and 64 bit is not the same as recording bit depth. Cubase has the ability to record at bit depths of 16, 24, 32, 32 bit floating point, and 64 bit in ADDITION to internal processing of 32 bit and 64 bit. Two different subjects. Thanks again.
  7. Thank you, I appreciate your time. I've been using Cakewalk Sonar as far back as about Cakewalk Sonar 7. The audio engine and 64-bit Double Precision Engine are indeed an old staple. However, the actual recording bit depth is confined to 16, 24, 32, and 64...not 32 bit floating point depth that has a dynamic range of about 1500 db. 32 bit=192db, 64bit=384. You really can feel the difference. Just a wish list upgrade.
  8. Is there any upcoming update to add 32 bit floating point recording to the options like Cubase and others? It would really be an awesome upgrade to a software that is virtually perfect sonically. Thanks.
×
×
  • Create New...