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SomeGuy

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  1. Is there any installer with only the CbB Sonitus DX plugins?
  2. SomeGuy

    Humble Bundle Magix software!

    Sound Forge and ACID are more valuable than VEGAS Pro, especially now that Resolve has a Free Version that is better than VEGAS Pro - for $0 buy-in. ACID runs circles around most generalist DAWs for Loop-Based Music production; so for those in that niche this is an amazing deal. The Sound Pools distributed with ACID Pro can be used for commercial compositions, and so can the other sound pool in the $25 Tier - that MSRP is for the Commercial Use License (I checked & Confirmed). The Music Maker sound pools are Non-Commercial Use Licenses - which is normal for all of MAGIX Consumer Market products (the products that aren't in the Pro Tier: Video Pro X, Samplitude Pro X4 [Suite], VEGAS Pro, ACID Pro, SOUND FORGE Pro, etc. I bought Resolve Studio, though. So I don't use VEGAS Pro anymore.
  3. SomeGuy

    Humble Bundle Magix software!

    Magic Connect (whatever they call it now) can be deflected before downloading the installers. So, you're wrong... just look πŸ˜‰ It's definitely opt in, and can be easily uninstalled; even if you fail to pay attention to what you tell it to download.
  4. SomeGuy

    WINDOWS 10 Pro

    All platforms are doing Network and Phone Stuff. Microsoft is years-late to that. Apple did this in 2014. No macOS users complain about this, and thier platform is even more chock full of this. I've never had this happen on my PCs, and I've been using Windows 10 since Day 1. Multiple PCs - many - not just 1. Features are the point of major updates. The update in between focus on stability, hardening, and polish. It's a Tick Tock Cycle? "Bloatware" to you are tiny apps that use no resources (as displayed), and are pretty much ignorable - not to mention, most can be uninstalled, at this point? Completely incorrect. Windows 10 updates have consistently removed old code and bloat, and even the install size of Windows 10 today is Gigabytes less than it was at RTM. This isn't even close to accurate. Performance has not gone down. This is completely incorrect. System requirements are the same as on release - and the same as Windows 7. Hardware requirements are for certain features taht require newer hardware components, because Microsoft isn't going to design an OS in 2015+ for 2009's hardware ecosystem. Problematic Windows Updates can be rolled back in 15 minutes on any PC from the settings app. The update backs up your entire Windows installation. It takes a couple of clicks to completely undo it, and then your PC is in the complete state it was in before the update. It doesn't waste much time, even when the update ends up being problematic. Installing the update takes longer than reverting the update, usually πŸ˜› There have been issues with the major updates - some major. So all you had to do was use your Windows 10 Pro 180 Day Deferment allotment to make sure you never get these updates on Day One. Wait a few months (or the full 6 months) and let the others play guinea pig. However, I haven't met any issues updating Day One for all of these updates. The biggest major issue was the File Deletion Bug, but that hit mostly insiders and the update was pulled quickly. A lot of Insiders run those builds on production PCs, which is a big no-no. ----- You're benefiting from a lot of things that are "better." They are just not "in your face" things. They're behind the scenes, under the hood. And frankly, that's the way you ideally want it... since huge changes in UI/UX are naturally disruptive. All Group Policy editor does is change registry entries. Which Entries work on a Given SKU of Windows depends on that SKU. Windows Home Edition will ignore some registry entries for policies that only work on Pro+, and Windows Pro will ignore some that only work on Enterprise or Education SKUs. The Group Policy to disable OneDrive isn't just for the OneDrive app. It prevents all applications from accessing OneDrive, and some applications have OneDrive integration even in the absence of the OneDrive app on your PC. If you want to disable the OneDrive app, all you have to do is uninstall "Microsoft OneDrive" from your PC, and avoid "breaking" other apps on your PC - as that Policy Setting has nothing to do with any service running on the computer. It just controls access to APIs used to access the OneDrive service by apps installed on the PC πŸ˜‰ There are only benefits going from 7 to 10, provided you don't hit any software/hardware compatibility snafus.
  5. SomeGuy

    WINDOWS 10 Pro

    Windows 10 is over ~ 4 years old, at this point. It's pretty polished, now. Microsoft is basically just updating the OS Apple-Style, though a twice as often - a Tick-Tock bi-annual cycle with Feature and Polish/Stability/Hardening releases. If they were on their previous upgrade cadence, we'd be ~1 year into Windows 11 by now. It was rougher when it was first released. Some of the UWP apps were missing fairly basic features, etc. however they were already a huge improvement over the Metro apps in Windows 8.x. Even Notepad has gotten an update! Each update they allow you to Uninstall more of the stock apps. "Most" can be uninstalled, now.
  6. SomeGuy

    WINDOWS 10 Pro

    OneDrive is an app you can uninstall. It's a normal app. Uninstall it, and it is gone from the system. Edge has a process that runs at all time, but Windows 10 suspends this process when the app isn't being used, so it actually uses no CPU and almost no RAM. This is similar'ish to App Nap on macOS. Most operating systems prefetch processes to improve load time, etc. macOS does this. It will load Safari processes on boot, even if you never use Safari, unless you hack your system to remove it (it's protected by default, like Microsoft Edge on Windows). Same with Spotlight, etc. Operating Systems like Windows 10 Pro and macOS Mojave are not configured out of the box for "locked down" Workstation use. So people who want minimal services and a locked down machine have to do that themselves - regardless of which OS you choose. For Linux, you can get halfway there by simply configuring the firewall to not open any ports by default during installation, and customizing which packages you install onto the system. The default configuration is for the broader market - like an Ubuntu install off the Desktop ISO. I honestly wouldn't run Windows on anything with < 8GB RAM, as these OSes (both macOS and Windows) use 2.5-3GB RAM out of the gate (after a fresh boot). You will not be able to get anything done, and even browsing the web will be painful. 8GB Minimum, and the developers are tuning increasingly for systems with solid state storage, as that is fairly ubiquitous right now (at least for boot drives) - old machines notwithstanding. Windows 10 is fine. Just right click the UWP apps you don't want, but pay attention because some of them have replaced old Win32 apps that performed the same function (Screen Snipper, Calculator, Voice Recorder - and Photos/Groove/Movies & TV are de facto, as the legacy Photo Viewers and Windows Media Player are based on legacy frameworks which do not support the newer CODECs, RAW Engine, etc. and have awful relative performance).
  7. SomeGuy

    WINDOWS 10 Pro

    Have had no issues whatsoever with Windows 10 - either on new machines or on machines upgraded from Windows 8.x Anything that shipped with Windows 7 is out of commission here: In a closet, or thrown in a dumpster. Windows 10 actually uses less resources than Windows 7. It has much better memory management. It performs much better with some file system operations - like bulk copying or moving files (where it is much faster). A lot of the subsystems are more optimized. It is also more fault tolerant. It supports a lot of file formats out of the box that require 3rd party software on Windows 10. It is far more power efficient, which also means it can eek out more performance out of your system with high sustained workloads (as the same machine will often generate less heat, and the Windows 10 code is better optimized/cleaner). People saying that Windows 7 runs better than Windows 10 are either regurgitating FUD, or running on machines so old that they do not have good Windows 10 drivers (or buggy drivers for the hardware that are exposed by Windows 10). This is simply not true. Windows 8 already had many of these advantages over Windows 7, it's just that the UI was so segregated that working on it was a nightmare. However, this is not a problem with Windows 10 - which has also actually done a lot of work to remove deprecated components out of the OS than ever before. This is why you often gain drive space after Windows 10 updates. Microsoft is removing a lot of legacy code and components that are absent in Windows 10, but actually bloating up Windows 7. The primary (and basically, only) reasons to stay on Windows 7 is to not upset the apple cart. This is important for the enterprise market, which often pays a lot of money for support and has to invest heavily when they upgrade their tech infrastructure. For the average media professional, this simply isn't the case. Latest update allows you to remove most of the preloaded UWP apps - within reason. If Windows 10 is "bloated," then Windows 7 has the kitchen sink in it. Also, Microsoft hasn't really "aggressively" moved to Windows 10. They are still supporting Windows 7 and 8, and most 3rd party developers still support those versions. Most of the launch complaints have been addressed over the past 4 years. You will not get support for a 10 year old OS in the Apple ecosystem. Go and see πŸ˜‰ So one could say Apple pushes their OS upgrades far more aggressively than Microsoft. 3rd Party Pro-Level software packages are having more success moving many people off of Windows 7 than Microsoft's free upgrade program, Lol. They are actually starting to drop support for those old OSes. Some newer technologies simply aren't supported on Windows 7. Sooner or later, you're going to have to move on... and Microsoft is maintaining Windows 10 in a fashion comparable to Apple and macOS... so unless you want to go macOS, you're better off just dealing with it and getting it over with - until you end up in a situation where you're forced to do so and don't have the luxury of a test machine to acclimate yourself to whatever seems different about it. Most complaints about Windows 10 "wrecking" their machines are largely placebo and confirmation bias. A quarter of them are likely fiction, as happens often on the internet.
  8. SomeGuy

    Native Instruments Audio Interfaces

    Totally agree. Their drivers are also rock solid, and one of the biggest reasons to go for them over some competitors - like M-Audio, which has had tons of BSOD issues due to their drivers on Windows, for example. The build quality is really good, as well. I agree they are severely underrated. I also think they have a pretty poor in-store representation, though. Most music equipment stores I go to have PreSonus, Focusrite, and M-Audio interfaces... but nothing from Steinberg Yamaha.
  9. SomeGuy

    Anyone using Air Structure 2

    Microsoft browsers have been known to have issues with large download (i.e. multi-GB download sizes). If you're using Edge or IE, try downloading with Firefox, Chrome, or Opera.
  10. SomeGuy

    Anyone using Air Structure 2

    1TB SSDs are like $100 these days. 2TB HDDs are probably cheaper, and cheaper Samsung 2TB SSDs are very cheap, as well. Disk Space is hardly worth the effort of worry, IMO. If you like Xpand!2 "a lot," you should naturally like Structure 2 "more than a lot." Structure's sound library is basically a superset of Xpand's. And it's definitely a huge step up from Cakewalk's stock TTS-1. If you have better Synths, then it's not worth caring about Structure 2. For an upstart, it's more than usable. They will eventually get better Samplers/Instruments, as well, and drop it. AIR's stuff was designed to be the out of the box instruments/plug-ins for [earlier versions of] Pro Tools (though later versions still bundle much of it). They [probably] should not be your "end game." That is the perspective from which I approach the question πŸ˜›
  11. SomeGuy

    Anyone using Air Structure 2

    AIR Instruments and Sampler are good for beginners and upstarts. If someone is just starting out, and is on a strict budget (and CbB will appeal heavily to them, given the price point), then AIR's stuff is a really good starting point that they should consider - especially since it's often on sale for rock bottom prices at Plug-In Boutique. Structure 2 is better than something like Independence Pro. It has better sounds, less useless esoteric stuff in its libraries. It's a fairly complete "starter library" for beginners, especially those into orchestral compositions. I recommend it for those people. Professionals making money with this stuff are [obviously] going to want the higher quality libraries, but the small fish have to start somewhere. Nother free is as good as this, and you won't find anything as good as Structure 2 for $30 (the current price at Plug-In Boutique, at least as of last night). Mini Grand and Strike are also pretty good, as is DB-33. Their Creative FX Complete Plus is also a good starter set of plug-ins that work well and are easy to use. A lot of AIR's stuff is bundled with M-Audio Interfaces, as well. So if you're just starting out and looking at interfaces, factor that in before purchasing their stuff. You might end up with redundant licenses, otherwise.
  12. SomeGuy

    Nice article on Cakewalk and BandLab

    Cakewalk is perfect. Extra features will just "bloat" the DAW up anyways, so why bother listing them. Also, the list would be so long, it would probably crash the forums. 4+ years is a lot to document in the world of Cubase/Logic Pro X/Pro Tools/Digital Performer/etc. updates and feature additions. I noticed the less-flexible routing the minute I tried to move some Pro Tools templates over to Cakewalk, for example; and the comparatively bad Audio and MIDI editing is as clear as day if you're coming from something like Pro Tools/Samplitude or Cubase/Digital Performer. When playing back MIDI with the Notation view open, the notes often lag behind, or run ahead of the audio. Something I do not experience in other DAWs (using the same Hardware, Interface... and operating with the same ASIO latencies). Studio One is a comparatively young DAW, so yes... a lot of features it is adding are "catch-up" features... Users are willing to suffer this in the short term, because PreSonus' development momentum is so good. Cakewalk will look more "on par" with it for that reason... however, it looks bad as a solution "going forwards" due to the comparative lack of development momentum. People who like it, but see it lacking in some areas will not have confidence that this will be rectified in due time, as a result. This is the problem I was referring to earlier in the thread. I can recommend Studio One, and feel somewhat confident that if the feature requests come in, the developers will implement that feature - probably in a point update that doesn't even entail upgrade fees. I cannot do this for Cakewalk by BandLab… so it puts people in a corner when you're trying to recommend it to other professionals; coming from more full-featured DAWs. For the beginners, this is not a problem (they will not notice it unless they are trying to translate tutorials created for another DAW to Cakewalk). Comparatively: DaVinci Resolve is summarily blown away by Media Composer for cutting/editing... But, users are willing to suffer this in the short term, because Blackmagic Design is very aggressively developing it... adding functionality in 0.1 updates that could legitimately stand as full version upgrades in other competing software packages. This is why it's basically the default recommendation. People have confidence in the product and its development team. There really isn't a solid economic reason to pick Studio One over Digital Performer - for example - unless you're just going with what is super popular on the internet, these days. PreSonus has done amazingly well with marketing, comapred to MOTU - both are developing quite well, however. Windows users are probably less familiar with DP due to it being macOS-only some years ago, but both now run on the same platforms; and Digital Performer is ever so slightly cheaper when you take the competitive upgrade (which is available to users who owned a paid version of SONAR [above the hobbyist SKU]). If you're a film composer, then going Studio One basically means you have to buy the Notion add-on for $49, as its in-built notation/scoring options are awful - compared even to Cakewalk. When Gibson shut down SONAR, most other DAW developers offered a cheap upgrade path (similar to when Apple shut down Aperture, or moved from FCP7 to X), so owning another DAW isn't surprising. It's almost impossible for a human being to NOT be biased. It's natural to be biased, and it's only natural that our biases fall towards what is most familiar and comfortable to us. Bias is normal. Being objective has more to do with empathy than a lack of bias πŸ˜‰
  13. SomeGuy

    Nice article on Cakewalk and BandLab

    There's a nice little saying on the Internet: "Calling someone a troll is trolling." Then again, that goes over the head of people who don't actually know what trolling is. Citing legitimate shortcomings in a product that happens to make the fanboys defensive is not trolling... I'd argue the opposite is what's actually happening. Why would I troll by misattributing a quote [that is fairly meaningless] to someone I have had little to no contact with on the forum? Are you even thinking about this? Or are you just that trigger happy to yell troll, simply because my posts are deemed "controversial" and the old guys around here are glad to agree with you? I've given my reasons for not changing it, and I've given the reasons for it happening. Unfortunately, everyone - except one person, it seems - could see what clearly happened. I don't care about the reputation of my [not so cleverly constructed] pseudonym on a random niche internet forum where you can simply create a new account for a reputational-reset in 5 minutes. Come on... Additionally, my post history indicates that I don't really frequent this forum much... So the whole "trolling this forum for months" isn't really panning out... It just so happens that I'm less prone to join the circle jerk and only feel the need to post when pointing out shortcomings, feature requests, etc. There are enough people around here to sing the praises of Cakewalk. If you're that exasperated with the "trolling," then stop putting up the Batman Signal by responding to posts. Ignore/Block and move on.
  14. SomeGuy

    Nice article on Cakewalk and BandLab

    No. The forum did it when I quoted the post and trimmed off the extra bits... I highlighted and pressed the "Quote selection" button. The forum put the name in automatically. I didn't check. It isn't that big a deal. You can easily reproduce this by doing it yourself (I just did). Not sure why you think I think this topic is important enough for me to engage in that type of [blatantly transparent] deception, particularly when the text quoted is completely mundane in nature. I didn't edit it, because I'm lazy and not really watching this topic... Relevant entity has responded, so that discussion is over, as far as I'm concerned... Don't get ahead of yourself. ----- Being able to work well on Dual (or even Triple) monitors is fairly basic for most "Pro DAWs," these days. I wouldn't use any Audio or Video software that didn't support at least a Dual Monitor setup. It's far too claustrophobic without it - particularly with most PC displays being Widescreen.
  15. SomeGuy

    Nice article on Cakewalk and BandLab

    My response was to a specific statement made in this thread. The question was rhetorical. The answer was clearly implied...
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